2013 in Review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 4,900 times in 2013. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 4 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

The Evolutionary Self-Protection ‘No-Touch Knockout’ Open Invitation

The Evolutionary Self-Protection

‘No-Touch Knockout’

Open Invitation

Preamble:

The ESP is based on no principle more important and pervasive than that of open and honest questioning. Without it, evolution cannot occur as learning will inevitably always be guided away from honest progression towards obscurity, inefficacy and invalidity.

My name is Josh Nixon, and I am the founding instructor of my methods, which I call ‘Evolutionary Self-Protection’. It is not perfect, will never be and will continually try to be. It is only through open and honest questioning that this continually evolutionary approach can truly be adopted, and so I have been led to this current moment and this message I am writing in it.

It has come to my attention that many instructors of different systems from around the world are teaching methods of causing knockouts or similar loss-of-consciousness effects without physically touching the target individual. These kinds of teachings often fall under levels of ridicule perhaps unsurpassed in the martial arts community. The general consensus seems to be polarised between two parties; one saying that it is rubbish (to put it milder than most) and that these instructors are lying to themselves and everyone else, and one saying that it’s true and above question.

I am, if nothing else, a questioner. I do not merely question the validity and efficacy of these methods, but I question those who default to ridiculing too. I also question myself and my methods. As such, I am always looking to learn from those who know things that I don’t.

If these ‘no-touch knockouts’ are true and valid methods for self-protection, then they would completely revolutionise the entirety of the current paradigm of self-protective methods, or at least certainly the ones I teach. It could empower many individuals to protect themselves who struggle with physical methods due to health or age. In fact, such ability could potentially render everything else taught in self-protection methods such as mine utterly obsolete.

This is not a challenge, a joke, an attempt to poke fun or anything of the sort. It is a genuine attempt to understand something that I currently don’t and strive for true progress in the field of self-protection through open and honest informal questioning and testing.

The Invitation:

I, Josh Nixon, would like to hereby invite anyone claiming the ability or knowledge of being able to induce a loss of consciousness in a human being without touching them to a fair, honest and open demonstration. The subject will be myself.

I would very much like anyone with this ability to help me find out whether or not it does exist. Following are the rules I would like to attach for such a demonstration:

Terminology:

‘Subject’ – the participant allowing the demonstrator to perform a no-touch knockout on them.

‘Demonstrator’ – the participant demonstrating the ability to perform a no-touch knockout on the subject.

The Rules:

  • No physical contact is to be made between the participants:
    • By ‘physical contact’ it is meant that no molecular structures under the direct control of one participant may touch those of another during the demonstration. This includes, but is not limited to:
      • Bodily touching: striking, manipulation of biomechanical weaknesses (often referred to as ‘pressure points’), striking with clothing or other objects, thrown objects…
  • No technological aids may be used to induce effects on the subject:
    • By ‘technological aid’ we mean manufactured devices, overt or concealed, however powered. These are prohibited and could have a negative effect on the subject. This includes, but is not limited to:
      • Emitters of electricity (Tasers, static charges, etc), projectile-launching devices, emitters of electromagnetic frequencies (such as light, heat, microwaves, x-rays, etc)…
  • No substances that could be potentially damaging to the subject’s health are to have any part in the demonstration.
    • By ‘substances’, we mean molecular chemical compounds. This includes, but is not limited to:
      • Gases, liquids, powdered solids, anything ingested through inhalation, anything ingested through the digestive system, anything ingested through the bloodstream, anything ingested through a mucous membrane…
  • The event must be open to be watched by spectators.
  • Those participating in the event must consent to being filmed for documentation purposes.
    • Anyone participating in the event can request a copy of footage, in which case all reasonable measures must be taken to comply with such a request.
  • The subject is allowed to organise various health and safety measures. This includes, but is not limited to:
    • A crash mat or similar soft surface to minimise risk of injury from falling in the event of loss of consciousness.
    • Attendant/s to guide the subject to the ground/to the safety surface in the event of loss of consciousness.
    • First aid supplies and those with medical knowledge to assist in the event of loss of consciousness.
    • Attendant/s to maintain the subject’s personal security.
  • The subject’s position, state and activities prior to the demonstration of no-touch knockout ability is his/her choice, and all participation is done of their own free will. Any compliance with the requests of the demonstrator is of the subject’s free choice.
    • Compliance with any requests of the demonstrator may override any rule, but must be announced to all present beforehand.

Get In Touch!

If you would like to demonstrate the ability to perform a no-touch knockout, simply have a go, watch such an event, try an idea you’ve had for inducing such an effect or prove yourself in a documented event with evidence you can post online or do whatever you want with, I’d love to hear from you!

This event can happen anywhere (within reason) and I will do everything I can to organise a venue and time that is convenient for both of us.

If you’re interested and would like to organise an event or just know more about it all, get in touch via any of the following:

Email:                                                   evolutionaryselfprotection@gmail.com
Facebook Page:                                facebook.com/EvolutionarySelfProtection
Facebook Group:                             facebook.com/groups/EvolutionarySelfProtection
Twitter:                                                twitter.com/EvolutionarySP
Google+:             search for              ‘Evolutionary Self-Protection’
LinkedIn:                                             uk.linkedin.com/in/JoshSchamaelNixon
YouTube:                                             youtube.com/user/EvolutionarySP
Website/Blog:                                   evolutionaryselfprotection.com

I hope to hear from you soon!

Yours with respect,

Josh Nixon

Founding Instructor, Evolutionary Self-Protection

P.S. It has come to my attention that similar claims of being able to knock people over, push, pull or otherwise move a person around without touching them, from a distance (not relying merely on inducing the flinch response) are numerous, and so this invitation is also extended to those with any such abilities or skills.

‘New Violent Crime Tactics’ Fake Crimestoppers Message

imageTHIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN UPDATED – SEE BELOW.

A friend posted this recently in a Facebook group I am part of and I thought it was worth mentioning. As anyone who has undertaken any good self-protection training knows, criminals will often work with deception and distraction tactics in order to get what they want, whether that’s your money, your vehicle, your body, your life or whatever else. Deception and distraction are often the key to their successes.

This is nothing new, and I’ve heard of these tactics before, but it’s always good to keep an eye on the current trends with crime if we want to be prepared to deal with or prevent it.

You can click the image to the right to see it larger (or go to where I got it from: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152312346350293) and read what it says exactly, but here are the key points:

  • This was noted in a rural area.
  • Gangs are using different methods of distraction to get people out of their cars.
  • There is a gang initiation that has been reported by the police where a car seat is placed by the road with a fake baby in it, waiting for someone to stop and check on the ‘baby’.
    • The location of this seat is usually beside a wooded or grassy (field) area and the victim is dragged into the woods, beaten, robbed and/or raped. They are left for dead. It has been reported that female victims are more likely to be raped and males are more likely to be robbed.

Aside from this distraction tactic, there is another that is mentioned in this letter:

  • Gangs are now throwing eggs at windscreens in order to force you to stop.
  • This works because the windscreen wiper smears the egg across the windscreen in a wide arc and if the egg comes into contact with water they become milky and can, according to this letter, block your vision up to 92.5%. I’m not sure where they get that figure from with such accuracy (Simple milky-egg opacity test? No idea.)but we can ascertain at least that milky eggs blocking your vision at all is not good!

The advice given for both situations is simple: DON’T STOP. Don’t even slow down. If you see the baby seat by the road or if you get egged, get to safety and dial 999 as soon as possible and tell them what you’ve seen and where. Don’t get complacent with the feeling of getting away. You did, but if you don’t call then the next person might not!  If you get egged, don’t use the wipers and definitely don’t use your spray. That’s what they’re counting on. If you do have to stop somewhere, of course do so safely for everyone else as well as yourself and keep your doors locked and windows closed. Pick where you stop wisely if you absolutely must stop. If you can see well enough to drive to safety safely, then do so.

This was posted to Facebook on the 11th of December 2012, and came to my attention yesterday.

Update: The Importance of Checking Information and What This Means to Us:

Now, as I’ve heard of these and similar tactics many times before, I took this seriously which is the approach I would advocate everyone take when hearing these things. Take it seriously until you hear otherwise, and then learn what you can from it. I had doubts about it, but shared it anyway for the useful information that can be taken from it regardless.

I contacted Staffordshire Police about the issue and they replied informing me that it is in fact a hoax (hence the poor grammar in the letter). According to this website:

This email did not originate with Crimestoppers, and the content of the email is false.

So now we know that the information is in fact fraudulent. However, let us not take this as an impetus to become blind to the possibility of such a thing happening, and thus place ourselves in a victim-state. If someone throwing around an email can think of it, so can a criminal! We know for a fact that distraction and deception tactics are widely used from small to large scales by criminals to victimise people, so take this as a warning and as inspiration if nothing else of something that theoretically could happen, and is theoretically possible.

2012 in Review

image2012 has been an interesting year for the CSPS. We’ve seen a lot of growth and a lot of progress, on every level. New students have come up and older students are going from strength to strength. I am so proud of the students I have and the progress they’re making. Our syllabus has seen evolution too as new concepts have been learned, alongside new drills and training methods being implemented and developed.

This blog has been largely neglected of late due to me focussing on my own training and, more importantly, on teaching and the development of the CSPS itself. Looking at it, I’ve only done ten posts this year! Despite that, the blog’s had steady views every day and a lot of very positive feedback so far, which is greatly appreciated. I’ve also been approached by various people asking for specific topics to be explored in the future, which I’m working on right now.

imageAs a result of various discussions on- and offline, there is a lot of planned content for 2013 and so I’ll keep working on getting that out to you when I can. If anyone has a topic or question you want addressing, feel free to get in touch however you like and I’ll get on it! Reviews, training logs, factual articles, opinion articles, instructional articles… it’s all going to be here so make sure you keep your eye on us.

A local martial arts class that I teach at called PHDefence is also seeing a lot of change in the transition to 2013, and I’m excited to see where that goes. At the end of 2012, the students there made incredible strides forward with their training too, and I’m extremely proud of them. 2013 will be an exciting year for them too!

I hope everyone had a good Christmas and is having a fantastic New Year’s Eve. I wish you all an awesome 2013!

Until next time,
FCIns. Josh Nixon, CSPS

WordPress Review: CSPS Online in 2011

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2011 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 1,800 times in 2011. If it were a cable car, it would take about 30 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

Happy New Year and a Warm Welcome for Letter Receivers

Hi,

This next bit will only really make sense if you’re in one of the lucky areas who have received one of the new 2012 PHDefence invitation letters. This is a big deal – there’s only 500! Letter holders are entitled to a free session!

You already know about the PHDefence and the CSPS from your letter, but if you’d like to know more, this page will tell you about the CSPS in detail and this page has details of all classes that are going on at the moment, with information on PHDefence too. This page has information on me. I do around half of the teaching at PHDefence as a guest instructor. There’s frequently asked questions here, and you can find us all over the Internet through the menu at the top of this site.

If any of you have any questions about PHDefence, the CSPS or anything else, then feel free to get in touch any way you like. You can email me directly at csps.info@gmail.com. Alternatively, everyone is welcome to join the CSPS Forum, which has a PHDefence members-only section too. You can find that here.

To everyone though: we hope you had an awesome Christmas and that you have an even better New Year!

Thank you to everyone who’s supported the CSPS and PHDefence; Twitter followers, retweeters, favouriters and Tweeters, emailers, YouTube subscribers, likers and commenters, forum members, LinkedIn connections, Facebook likers and commenters, blog followers, subscribers and commenters, and all of the students, instructors, friends and family who have turned these dreams into reality.

Have a wonderful 2012.

FCIns. Josh Nixon

Home Security: Easy and Cheap Upgrades

This is a good one.

As you may know, I’m a big fan of Lifehacker. I think their approach towards everything is brilliant and they’re often my go-to website if I’m not sure of anything technological (and often other stuff too). If you’re not keeping up to date with their posts, then you’re missing out and I heartily recommend you do something about it!

The other day, Melanie Pincola wrote this article on the site, which outlines some really effective strategies based on burglary statistics. Here is a brief summary of the main points.

Know Your Enemy! The Anatomy of a Burglary:

These statistics are from 2005 and are US-centric, but this graphic from the Washington Post still shows you some important and useful information to bear in mind when evaluating your home security measures:

image

Most Burglaries Occur Between 10:00 and 15:00. Whether this is true of the UK or not, it ultimately means very little. Beware the false sense of security that can arise from these kinds of statistics! While it is good to remember which peak times prevail in your local area for burglaries (get in touch with your local police force for information; they can steer you towards some up-to-date statistics), you should not feel that at other times there’s any cause for relaxation of your security measures! Thinking ‘Ahh, I’ll leave it – it’s after three…’ is not a good mindset! Just because most burglaries happen within certain times, it doesn’t mean the next one will!

Burglars look for homes that appear unoccupied, and residential homes, as you know, tend to be empty during those hours because people are at work. If you’re out of the house during those hours and are concerned about burglaries in your neighborhood, consider setting a random timer to turn the TV or radio on during those hours.

If you have a second car, keep it out in the driveway while you’re at work. Or, perhaps you can rent your driveway during the daytime (besides making your home less attractive to thieves, you can make a few extra bucks. Win!); previously mentioned Park Circa is one place you can find people looking for a parking spot in your neighborhood.

Do you use gardening services or other home maintenance services like window cleaning? Schedule those services (which don’t require you to be at home) during those prime theft hours.

Good advice here, well worth following. Just make sure that you can trust whoever you’re sending around to your empty house to do work though! How do you know they’re not an opportunistic thief, or recently become laden with debt and are desperate to pay it off? That’s it – you don’t!

The typical house burglar is a male teen in your neighborhood—not a professional thief and 60 seconds is the most burglars want to spend breaking into your home. This suggests you only need enough security to thwart the regular person. Simple things like the
"my scary dog can run faster than you" sign may be one of the most effective theft deterrents, other than—or in addition to—actually owning a scary dog. (Even a small dog prone to barking helps, though.) Regular "beware of dog" signs work too, especially if you add some additional supporting evidence of dog ownership, like leaving a dog bowl outside by your side door.

The Washington Post suggests deadbolt locks, bars on windows, and pins in sash windows may be effective theft deterrents. It goes without saying to make sure all the entry points are locked (but, still, 6% of burglaries happen that way).

Again, while this is excellent advice that we all should take into consideration, don’t think that older or younger, or female, local people can’t be burglars based on this! What we should take from this is that the more difficult we make our homes to break into, then the more warning we’ll get if someone’s breaking in, and the more time we’ll have for either the police to arrive after you call them or for you to escape, or whatever other plans you have in place.

In order of percent of burglaries, thieves come in through: the front door, first-floor windows, and back door primarily, followed by the garage, unlocked entrances, and the basement. Look at reinforcing all of these entry points, of course, but if you want to know where the best places are to put your security cameras, the front and back door and first floor windows are your best bets. (We’ve featured quite a few DIY ones using old webcams or your PC.) Fake security cameras placed at those points might also be effective.

With your outside lighting, make sure those points of entry are well lit (motion-detector lights are inexpensive and don’t use a lot of energy) and clear of thief-hiding shrubbery.

When placing lights and cameras, think about how much they can see – treat them as if you’re placing sentries, because essentially that’s what you’re doing! Corners are great, especially if they can oscillate and see all around from there. You can’t sneak past a camera through a wall! Make sure the ends of the camera’s oscillation ‘touch’ the walls though, or you’ve just made them a handy little invisibility path! If you’re placing dummy cameras, make sure they’re very visible and preferably have blinking LEDs on them (an easy thing to make if yours haven’t). Something that can be seen from the road is best, and from any other likely access points. Always think about where a thief can hide around your house, and what you can do about it. Try breaking into your house yourself (simulated of course, unless you really want to test out your windows’ anti-shatter strength!) to see where your security holes are.

An average of 8 to 12 minutes is all burglars spend in your home. If a thief does get into your house, you can prevent loss of your valuable objects by making them harder to find than within those 12 minutes. The dresser drawer, bedroom closet, and freezer are some of the first places thieves look, so forget about those hiding places. Instead, consider hiding things in plain sight.

Perhaps set up a red herring for possible thieves: Leave out an old laptop the thief can quickly grab and go. Even better: install Prey to track the stolen laptop.

Once again, I would take this information in, but I wouldn’t swear by it. The mindset of ‘He’s probably gone, it’s been 15 minutes, so we can come out from hiding now…’ isn’t what I would recommend! That’s only if you’re in though of course. Making things hard to find is a great third defence, after making the house look unappealing to burglars, then making it difficult for them to get in. The longer they’ve got to mess around, the more likely the police will arrive or they’ll give up, panic, and leave empty’-handed. The links are worth following in this quote. Prey is invaluable, and I may do an article on it myself. I have it installed on both of my computers and my phone.

We’ve previously noted several ways to protect your home while traveling, including using push lights in your windows and asking your neighbors for a vacation check. Lifehacker reader fiji.siv reminded us of a small detail like not having your garbage cans put out as a sign that you’re away; make sure any help you get from friends or neighbors include the little stuff like that (putting out garbage cans, getting the mail, maybe even cutting the grass).

Don’t forget the daily stuff like stopping newspaper and mail delivery, if you don’t have someone picking those up for you.

And, of course, the tried-and-true method of looking like you’re home: use a random timer on your indoor lights or TV.

This is all, once again, well worth paying attention to – basically just make it look like you’re in when you’re not! There are loads of ways you can do this, as the link in this quote shows you.

There’s a lot of other information in the comments on Lifehacker, so that’s also worth a look. What measures do you take? Feel free to share your thoughts in the comments below, or if you’re especially awesome, join the discussion on the CSPS forum.

How to Increase Your Child’s Ability to Cope with Bullying

Scenes like these should not be familiar.

Hi all,

I recently found this article thanks to a post from @Beatbullying on Twitter, and thought I would share it with everyone, as it is essential knowledge.

One of the major issues with bullying is, aside of course from the bullying itself, the fact that many parents can find it difficult to tell if their child is being bullied in the first place, as it is perhaps not discussed enough.

On the article, found at http://ronald-williams-garcia.suite101.com/increasing-your-childs-ability-to-cope-with-school-bullying-a392456, there is much advice on what kinds of symptoms to look out for if you suspect your child may be a victim at school or anywhere else for that matter. Rising above it all in my opinion is the following piece of advice for parents:

In addition to being observers, parents must develop good communication with their children. There should be daily time set aside to discuss the child’s experience in school or school related activities. These should be free talks more from a peer to peer dynamic. Parents should not present themselves as investigators but rather interested listeners to their children. When children discuss their feelings or concerns this is not a time to demean or criticize. It is a time to be empathetic and reflective on what the child is expressing. All of this requires, of course, that the parent learn to be ACTIVE LISTENERS!!!

This is not just advisable for parents to listen to however – the same applies for siblings, grandparents and friends – if you have a friend who shows signs of bullying, don’t feel awkward in asking if they’re ok! The only way bullying can be effectively combated is if people work together, and this has to happen across the world in every scale. Talk to the new kid; invite them to eat with you. Make an effort to be nice to people, and it’ll pay off. Beating bullying isn’t all about smashing attackers with hammer fists and elbow strikes, or about locking them up and throwing them to the floor – it’s about stopping it happening in the first place. Make the bullies the minority, and make sure everyone knows about it. As Mahatma Gandhi said:

‘You must be the change you want to see in the world.’

I couldn’t have put it better myself.

Image courtesy of http://nationalbullyinghelpline.co.uk/images/bullying_child.jpg

PHDefence (25.06.2011) Feedback

Another great training session down at PHDefence! After going though some basic Wing Chun that people were getting caught up on, I took the Purples aside and focussed on seeing how they were doing regarding their Blue stuff for their next grading. I’m sending around an email in a minute to all you who are grading to make sure you know the time and format, etc.

We’ve had interest from a new student as well this week which was great – straight after putting up new posters! Must be doing something right! As you all know, PHDefence is looking to expand and can only do that with more students, so bring anyone who would enjoy it; kids and adults. Ideally, we would have enough students to split the kids into three separate sessions – beginners’, intermediates’ and advanced – where absolute beginners would just have the first one, intermediates would be able to stay for the second, and advanced could stay for the others (helping out, etc) if they wanted to for extra training in the basic stuff (recommended) and some teaching experience too, holding pads for them, etc and helping out. However, more hours means more rent which means a need for more students! Ideally, we’d also have a separate adults’ class as we used to before they went to university, etc.

Another little point about elbows as well that was made today:

Slashing elbow strikes move in an arc, slashing the target with the bone.
Smashing elbow strikes move in a straight line, smashing into the target.

Also, something to bear in mind about the Forms – the old video and the old guide may be wrong a bit; it’s from when I was a student and not an instructor, so I’m pretty sure it won’t be very good! However, it’ll still be a good pointer. Go from what we’ve been doing though in class more than those things, consider them a rough and ready guide.

See you all next week, and a warm welcome to our new student/s,
FCIns. Josh Nixon

CSPS Endon Taster (15.06.2011) Feedback

Numbers were back up again this week, and we went through the basic ideas behind kicking, with a little bit of upper body striking too, saying we ditched the plan last week. All in all, a pretty enjoyable session! We finished off with a few shuttle runs for fun too.

Next week we’ll be looking at basic defensive work in the CSPS. Before you say it, I know all of it is defensive work; I mean parrying, covering up, evasion, etc – generally being unstrikable to the best of your ability, and also being ungrabbable.

As you know, there’s a heavy influence on CSPS from my old Wing Chun training so you know it’ll be good. Also a little more recently Silat has had an influence on it too, so there’ll be a good variety of methods to play with next time.

If you’ve missed some or all of the tasters so far by the way, don’t feel that you’ll be at a disadvantage or anything – nobody will know any more than you, apart from a couple of my existing students. These sessions don’t follow on at all; each one’s on a different topic.

See you next week!

FCIns. Josh Nixon

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