ESP Log–March 2013

by Josh Nixon

As more and more goes ahead with the early days of Evolutionary Self-Protection, I get busier and busier and, admittedly, neglect my writing! So as always this little log is later than I meant it to be…

Short and sweet this time. While March has been a quiet month for training, it’s been one of my busiest yet. I don’t want to say anything too much about it yet (other than to a couple of choice individuals – feel free to feel honoured as I’m sure you do!) but suffice to say there’s a project underway that will be very interesting for anyone interested in self-protection, and probably other forms of combat as well (martial arts, sports, etc).

It will be online, community-driven and completely free.

I’ve also been exploring some extremely interesting collaborative opportunities with other instructors, as collaboration really is the only true way forward in combat instruction. At least, from my current perspective it is! That, as always, could change if evidence supports.

More fresh content is on its way!

FCIns. Josh Nixon of the CSPS is at Stoke College’s Disability Day–25th of April 2012

On Wednesday the 25th of April 2012 FCIns. Josh Nixon (that’s me) will be representing the Combative Self-Protection System at Stoke College’s ‘Disability Day’. From 10:00-14:00 you’ll have the opportunity to speak with me and I’ll answer any questions you have about the CSPS or training in general. Details are also on our events page.

The event will be held at Cauldon Campus on Stoke Road, Shelton, ST4 2DG, in the Sports Hall from 10:00-14:00 on Wednesday the 25th of April 2012.

Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service have said on their site:

The aim of the event is to raise disability awareness and provide information, advice and guidance to individuals within the college and the general public. There will be over 60 organisations on hand to provide the most up to date information on a range of disability issues to an eager audience and the celebrity guests will be ‘Race2Recovery’ who have recently been on the BBC’s Top Gear.

(From http://www.staffordshirefire.gov.uk/2091.asp on 14.04.2012.)

It’s going to be a great opportunity to speak with a lot of interesting organisations and individuals so I heartily recommend coming and taking a look – everyone’s welcome! I’ll be on hand for the full four hours to answer all of your questions on training with or without disabilities for self-protection, health, fitness and personal security. I’ll also be representing local martial arts class PHDefence, which I am Co-Instructor of. There may be an offer available to people who attend this event…

See you there!

-FCIns. Josh Nixon, CSPS

P.S. There may also be sweets…

Martial Art? Combat Sport? Self-Defence? Self-Protection? What’s the difference? Why does it matter?

By Josh Nixon, ESP

Please note: This article is now outdated. It is merely retained here for archive purposes, so the changing nature of things here can be seen by all. Consider the following just my older thoughts on the matter, from which the current ones have come.

Here is the updated version of things: http://evolutionaryselfprotection.wikia.com/wiki/Self-Protection

In discussions of different training systems, it becomes immediately apparent after a quick Google or a sift through YouTube that the terms used in the title of this article are used more or less interchangeably by a great many people. This may seem unimportant, but it is becoming a big issue in the martial arts community today. In an attempt to help with this problem, and also to clarify my use of these terms online and offline, I thought it would be useful to produce a short list of these terms, and how I would define them, with some examples of common traits. Note that the following is merely my personal use of these terms, and other peoples’ usage of them will vary, as they are of course completely free to do so.

Martial Art: A martial art is exactly what the name suggests – an art. An art is a method of expression through application of creativity, and is typically concerned with aesthetics. As such, martial arts are often concerned with aesthetics, historical traditions, cultural customs and philosophy. These systems will often focus most of their training on one aspect of fighting, though not always. Martial arts can be traditional or modern, and different systems are often mixed into hybrid systems, usually in order to address what the instructors feel is a shortcoming of their original system. These are often termed Mixed Martial Arts (MMA), though this term is now used more for combat sports systems so many adopt the alternative term Hybrid Martial Arts (HMA) to avoid confusion. Martial arts can be thought of as a method of self-perfection rather than necessarily self-protection, though of course all martial arts training will have some real combative merit, and will often be extremely potent systems with which to protect oneself, so they should be respected as such.

Combat Sport: A combat sport is, again, exactly what the name suggests. If a system focuses on competition then it is a combat sport. These systems are often characterised by points-based sparring, where points may be awarded according to damage dealt, submission, knockout, etc or on aesthetic grounds, for example. Tournaments are often held on a regular basis, and the more well-known ones are the ones you see on TV and online. If training is focussed solely on fitness with any combative merits being considered secondary then that system could also be considered a combat sport.

Self-Defence: Self-Defence is where this topic gets confused on a regular basis, and arguably where it matters a little more pressingly. Self-Defence is a term used for reactive systems that are geared towards dealing with a combative situation by reacting to a physical attack. This includes Reality-Based Self-Defence (RBSD) systems. These systems are not concerned with aesthetics, historical traditions, cultural customs or philosophy.

Self-Protection: Self-Protection is a term used for systems that, in addition to the reactive methods of Self-Defence, incorporate proactive methods such as pre-emptive striking, and a great emphasis on awareness, evaluation, avoidance, evasion and communicative, noncombative strategies such as verbal de-escalation. An understanding of psychology thus often features prominently. As a result, self-protection systems are concerned heavily with how to stop a situation from becoming physically combative in the first place so that in a sense the physical combatives are secondary in focus. However, these physical combatives will often take up a large portion of the training time in sessions. These systems are also not concerned with aesthetics, historical traditions, cultural customs or philosophy.

So why does it matter? It matters because any confusion between these terms can lead to extreme differences of expectation and reality in training. For example, a traditional martial arts class marketing themselves as a combat sport might not be delivering what the students who have seen their posters are looking for, if they rarely hold tournaments or are not very competitive in their training. Similarly, a combat sport class focussed on UFC-style cagefighting could accidentally mislead prospective students by marketing themselves as a martial arts class, as people seeking a martial arts class may be looking for the tradition, philosophy and artistic values that a sports-based class would simply not be concerned with. This becomes more concerning when martial arts are marketed as self-defence or self-protection, however, as confidence in a martial arts technique trained from a perspective which is concerned with aesthetics can often be extremely dangerous in a real combative situation, or even fatal.

This article is not a criticism of any system, style, art or form, but rather a comment on the terminology used to denote them, and an appreciation of the effects that the confusion of these terms can have. Remember though: don’t judge a class necessarily by what it categorises itself as, because at the moment there is almost an interchangeability in many of these terms. Now that these terms have been clarified however, at least if nothing more our ESP-related discourse will be clear and unambiguous.

PHDefence (19.11.2011) Feedback (and a general update on everything…)

Hi all,image

It’s been a while! PHDefence has still been going strong, but I’ve just not been posting. Busy, busy, busy. PHDefence was awesome this morning despite the low numbers again. Paul took them through some epic drills – really fun and unique too – I couldn’t help joining in; it was really enjoyable! I took a section on ground mobility with some rather awesome Systema-inspired drills, and then took the higher grades through some more advanced knee striking including how to get effective knee strikes off on the ground, and then we finished off, as always, with a short session of Russian combat massage which everyone seems to enjoy a lot!

I don’t blame you, it’s amazing. Also, PHDefence is the only place I’ve ever been to where I’ve seen it. Most martial arts places I’ve been to have been far too set in their ways for something like this, which is not a criticism; merely an observation. It is a reason why I think PHDefence is awesome though.

They need more students, however. Very badly. In fact, if they don’t get a more reliable flow of students in soon, they will have to look at different venues and times, and all sorts, which could end up seriously inconveniencing a couple of their students. If you’re in the Stoke-on-Trent area, please get in touch if you’re at all interested! I want to help them as much as I can because it’s a real shame to see such a brilliant club go through hard times. Always-up-to-date details are on the classes page.

On a lighter note, I have many plans. As soon as my ridiculous workload from university lessens a little, I have a few articles lined up for your enjoyment. The forum’s still going strong in terms of awesome material, but does need more members, so get yourself on there if you haven’t already! Also, once I clear a space in my schedule, I intend to start filming some videos for the CSPS YouTube channel so if you haven’t already, subscribe and you’ll get the uploads in your inbox the moment it happens! I’ve got some really useful material lined up, so keep yourself in the loop!

Exciting times!

Until next time,
FCIns. Josh Nixon

Image courtesy of http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/0f/Knee_strike.jpg

CSPS Forum Now Online!

Just a quick announcement that the forum is now online, at http://cspsonline.proboards.com (also buttoned at the top of this blog) – of course, it’s free and you don’t have to be a CSPS member to join (but if you are then send us a PM to prove it and we’ll put your grade in your custom title for awesomeness) or even a martial artist/self-protectioner (is that the term? No idea, well I guess it is now…) to join. Most of the discussion is of course focussed on combat, but there’s a general section and everything too. There’s a public board as well that you don’t need a registration to post in, because we’re that thoughtful.

See you on there!
FCIns. Josh Nixon

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