Training Notes – Endon – 13.03.2015

Red Noses Focal B&WYesterday was, of course, Red Nose Day! At the time of writing this post, their website says £78,082,988! Incredible.

We couldn’t let this day go by without some form of recognition and so, while I was sitting at work thoughtfully squidging my friend Snortel the red nose, I had an idea for a rather enjoyable drill we could mark the occasion with: Red Nose matches!

So, after a few shuttle runs, shoving each other around and shoulder mobility exercise, we got to it: in pairs, everyone has a red nose on. As a test of your parrying and blocking, you have to knock each other’s red nose off! No point-keeping or anything; just a bit of fun to warm up with.

We used this however to make a very useful point.

If you keep your attacker at range 3 (about an arm’s length away) and you’re trying to control them like that, good luck. I say that because it’s incredibly difficult to protect yourself successfully while you’re there, as you usually get into a kind of standoff where you’re reacting to their strikes, throwing some of your own, and you’re too easily overwhelmable. You have to be extremely skilled to manage to parry and/or block an unrelenting attack keeping someone at that distance.

However, as we were saying the week before last, fear (or inefficient training) can lead to mis-management of this distance between yourself and the person trying to assault you. As we found with this lighthearted drill, it was much more efficient to move in to range 1-2 and control the limbs of the attacker much more closely, restricting their movement and ‘jamming’ their attempts to strike.

Takedowns! …posturepostureposture…

Yet again, you’re going to be sick of me going on about this, but posture is everything in takedowns too! We looked at a couple of concepts: spine alignment and the position of our Centre of Mass (COM).

IMG_20150314_192001IMG_20150314_192013As we saw with our partners, applying a downward force to a straight spine doesn’t really do much to their posture. A straight, neutral stance is of course very stable as your COM’s reference point (marked X on my scribbles) is right between your feet along your centre line. (Wing Chun people are nodding sagely…)

However, if the spine is misaligned, things are different. Whether it’s a sideways bend (as the right-hand scribble on an old diary’s page attempts to portray) or a move forwards or backwards, this misalignment shifts the COM away from that centre line.

IMG_20150314_200559As the point on the floor directly below a person’s COM (reference point marked x on the above scribblings) is moved in any direction away from the centre, the posture of the person is weakened and their ability to withstand downwards pressure without falling to the floor is compromised. The person’s balance is off, and you can use that to your advantage! Think of it as moving that x towards one of the compass points to the right.

Prevent their feet from taking the natural step they’ll want to take to recover from this and lo and behold: a takedown just happened!

  1. Misalign the spine.
  2. Prevent recovery.
  3. Downwards force.

Of course there’s more to it than just this, and plenty that can be done besides, but this is a basic look at takedowns. This post was going to be just brief bullet points, but then I found I was in a typing-something-up mood!

The Aftermath: Justification and Explanation

After violence occurs, you have to be able to explain what happened and justify why it did. We took a simple drill – Person A attacks Person B however they like, and Person B responds – such as you’d find in any self-protection or martial arts class. What we did then, however, marks out quality mindful self-protection training from those who pay lip-service to the Force Continuum and to justifying your Force Deployment after violence takes place.

Person A then asks questions.

‘What did you do?’

‘Well why did you do that?’

‘Did you really have to? I mean, did you have to use that much force?’

‘Why didn’t you just walk away?’

‘Was he even of sound mind? For all you know he could have been vulnerable and you just slapped him!’

‘Couldn’t you have used less force? It seemed a bit excessive.’

‘I bet that really annoyed you. I’d have been furious. I bet you really wanted to give him some then, didn’t you?’

Person B has to justify what they did – honestly, openly and mindfully. When we talk about justification, it’s important to remember that you’re not just justifying yourself legally. Socially, you might have to justify yourself to the people around you (family, friends, colleagues) who could see you as ‘violent’, or as someone who’s ‘been in a fight’. It’s now up to you to explain to them that it wasn’t a fight: you protected yourself and had to. Personally, you will likely have to justify it to yourself as well. Doubts could spring up about what you did and whether it was the right decision, whether you could have de-escalated better, etc. After the violence has ended, there can be a lot of mess to clear up before it’s all over!

This underpins everything that we learn in an Evolutionary Self-Protection session. Never forget that you have to justify and understand what you’re doing. There’s a lot more to it than chucking your partner around and bashing the pads.

Even a silly bit of fun – knocking red noses off each other – in a room full of laughter is a valuable learning and training experience with obvious progression and subtle nuances for beginners and experienced participants alike.

Train mindfully. Train efficiently. Train evolution…arily? Yep, that’ll do!

Have an awesome weekend everyone – see you next week!

-Josh Nixon All the details of this class are on the Public Classes page up at the top. Your first session is FREE and all are welcome to come along and take part. Every session is beginner-friendly.

Training Notes – Endon – 06.03.2015

IMG_20150306_174443

This week’s session was our first to be held at Endon Village Hall now that we’ve moved there from our old venue in Stockton Brook. We’ll all miss the old place – it was the focal point of the local community in many ways, and many of us have trained there for years – but we were all looking forward to training in Endon.

The new venue is excellent: a bigger hall, convenient location and overall a really great place to train.

As always, it was a pleasure to see you all again and the quality of the training was truly excellent. The skill, progress and raw natural ability I see every week is truly incredible. Very well done to everyone. Awesome effort and fantastic atmosphere.

Last week, we worked on ‘the fence’ and used it as a framework to explore footwork, positioning and posture, as well as distance management, communicative strategies, striking and surviving an armed assault.

This week, we progressed from the basic skills we looked at last time and used them in some interesting and effective ways.

  • Warmup and exercise: most of this week’s exercise was focussed on quadrupedal movement – various methods of crawling, etc on the floor – and using those movements as incredibly useful (and fun!) exercises. We looked at Kong bounds and sideways Chimpanzee crawls in particular, as well as some rolling.
  • Fence – but what then?
    • That was the focus this time: once we’ve managed the distance, what then?
    • We looked at two basic skills and two ways in which they can be used:
      • Parrying: redirecting a movement without directly opposing its force.
        • Using our hands and forearms to parry straight punches to the face.
      • Blocking: directly opposing a movement forcefully, preventing it from continuing.
        • Using our forearms and elbows to block hook punches, slaps, etc to the side of the head.
        • Finding beneficial targets and ‘attacking the attack': stepping into the movement, intercepting it and applying an elbow to the pectoral (or shoulder) and a forearm to the bicep.
    • Economy of motion: using the fence as a starting point, the hands don’t have to move very far in order to successfully intercept an attack.
  • We looked at using the drop-step as a short, explosive movement that is useful both in intercepting an attack and in getting more mass behind a strike.
    • We also looked at pre-emptive striking (and the legality of it) and discussed some issues of the force continuum that must be considered.
  • Striking with the Knuckles:
    • Jab (your lead hand), cross (your rear hand) and hook punches.
    • Power generation:
      • The drop step
      • The preceding drop step (elastic recoil)
      • Rotational movements (incorporating elastic recoil)
      • Maintaining relaxation and mobility in the shoulders while striking
    • A progressive intensity striking drill to ensure straight, strong wrists.
  • Padwork with a ‘live’ partner:
    • Person A does pushups while Person B (wearing focus mitts) inconveniences them!
      • Distracting and annoying slaps, kicks, added resistance by pressing on Person A’s back, etc.
    • On command, Person A aggressively climbs their way up Person B while Person B tries to tread on them and kick them! This is more fun and less dangerous than it sounds, trust me…
    • Person A, standing, maintains control of Person B and moves Person B into position and strikes the pads that Person B presents at random timings and angles.
    • The pushups resume, and the drill continues…
    • This is a very enjoyable and yet exhausting drill where we accomplish a lot of things: we get very tired very quickly and do so in a situation of resistance: our partner is trying to make it difficult for us emotionally as well as physically so we learn to keep our focus on what we’re doing and avoid distractions. We learn how to get up from the floor in a dangerous situation safely and efficiently, we learn how to maintain control of an aggressive partner and we practice our striking too. We learn how to go from doing something else (in a position of disadvantage – lying down on the floor) to quickly and decisively acting on a stimulus beyond our control: the instructor shouting ‘GO!’ and our partner suddenly trying to tread on us and kick us while we get up.
  • We also looked at some of the methods employed last week and the week before against an assault with a stick, and finished off with some percussive massage – Russian style. More than just being very relaxing and beneficial for stretching out and loosening off any tension we’ve built up in training, we learn a lot about striking someone and dealing with incoming strikes too, as well as breathwork and awareness of tension and relaxation. Very useful work.

Many thanks to all who came, it was a pleasure as always, and see you all next time!

-Josh Nixon

All the details of this class are on the Public Classes page up at the top. Your first session is FREE and all are welcome to come along and take part. Every session is beginner-friendly.

Evolutionary Self-Protection is Moving to Endon

Hi everyone,

Wesley Methodist Church that we used in Stockton Brook has now been sold and so we’ve found a new venue for our Friday class!

Thankfully, we’ve only moved down the road to Endon Village Hall on Station Road in Endon (ST99DR). For those who haven’t been that way before, just keep going along Leek New Road past Endon High School until you come to a crossroads. Turn right there onto Station Road (there’s a church on the corner) and it’s just about 100 yards down there on your right. Car parking spaces are at the front.

It seems a great venue – nice and clean, and bigger than the last place we trained in. I’ll really miss the church in Stockton Brook after training and teaching there for about 8 years now – we all will – but I’m really looking forward to training in Endon.

The details are all on our public classes page but for your convenience:

Endon Village Hall, Station Road, Endon, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, ST9 9DR
All ages, fitness levels and ability levels welcome!
Fridays at 18:00-19:00.
Just £3 per session (£2 for NUS card holders). First session FREE!

See you tomorrow!

Josh Nixon
Founding Instructor, ESP

Please note we also offer affordable private and corporate training options for individuals and groups of all ages, as well as student discount on all our training, discounted flexible block booking options and a rewarding referral scheme.

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Training Notes – 27.02.2015

IMG_20150214_121842This week’s session was a lot of fun – many thanks to all who attended! It was wonderful to welcome so many new people all at once and awesome to have two more experienced members return after we’d missed them for a few weeks. We really got that particular kind of atmosphere this week that you can only get when you get more in than expected.

I hope you all have a great weekend and see you next time!

For those who are new to us, when I write these I often link to associated important concepts either on Wikipedia, other websites or our own small wiki that I’m working on for our specific concepts.

Threat Awareness is worth a look, as well as Threat Evaluation and Threat Avoidance. Communicative Strategies will come into play next time when we look at distraction and pre-emptive striking, and the Force Continuum is extremely important to bear in mind.

Of course, if anyone has any questions then feel free to get in touch!

This week, we looked at:

  • Footwork, posture and positioning: the importance of good posture can’t be overstated enough. As the squats, slams and burpees will have shown you in particular, good posture is everything.
  • Use of ‘The Fence’ to manage distance proactively (Without looking aggressive!) when someone’s squaring off and invading your personal space.
    • Fear and how it can lead us towards mis-management of that space. Backing off continually isn’t always the best option.
    • Keep your hands neutral and relaxed, but ready. They’re there if you need them, that’s all.
  • Footwork and relaxed movement when pushed around a bit.
    • (Progression: the same when punched.)
    • Keeping control: proximity and ‘sticking’ to the aggressor to limit their options. Again, it’s all about positioning and posture.
  • Striking from the Fence:
    • Hammer Fist
      • Relaxed arm drill: just feeling the weight of your arm.
    • Palm Strike
      • Relaxed striking: still feeling the weight of your arm, encouraging a whiplike acceleration.

When I’m asked what our methods are based on, I often discuss things like Systema, Wing Chun, Krav Maga, Jujutsu, etc. However, when it comes down to it, it’s all just physics, biology and psychology/sociology.

The most important thing to remember in striking: simple physics.

FORCE = MASS x ACCELERATION

Through our relaxed movement, we accelerate as fast as we can in any given space because we don’t have unnecessary tension working against that movement.

Through posture and refined (trained) movement, we get as much of our body mass behind that strike as we can.

The above helps us generate as much force as we possibly can. We further refine this with beneficial positioning and striking methods to apply that force as efficiently as we can: to get maximum effect from minimum required effort. This is what we call economy of motion.

We also looked at:

  • Dealing with someone striking us with a stick: working with a useful movement we developed last week (and the week before).
    • Once you decide you need to deploy force, and you find the right moment in which to do so, you must act immediately, efficiently and decisively.
    • Close distance and use your elbows to your advantage
    • Get control and make sure it’s a strong grip you have. Anything less than your strongest is not good enough.
      • An easy way to test this grip is have your partner violently shake their arm to see if they can wrench it free with brute force. Gripping with just your hands likely won’t be enough but keeping it close and against you, gripping efficiently and using positioning and posture to your advantage (and their disadvantage) will.

All in all, we’ve worked on a lot of things here. Something that’s worth bearing in mind was expressed well by Sonny Puzikas in a great video we recently shared on Facebook: these punches, kicks and swinging weapons are just movements. They only become a strike when they make contact with their intended target. Until then, they’re just movements.

Don’t fear a movement: train to work with it. Train intelligently and you work efficiently.

Once again, many thanks to all who came and see you next week! It was a pleasure and a privilege to train with such truly excellent people.

All the details of this class are on the Public Classes page up at the top. Your first session is FREE and all are welcome to come along and take part. Every session is beginner-friendly.

Training Notes – 20.02.2015

IMAG0206.jpgAs always, this week’s class was a lot of fun! Many thanks as always to everyone who came and we hope to see everyone else again soon! The sheer skill and natural ability I saw this week was phenomenal. Everyone did exceptionally well and should be extremely proud of their progress and prowess.

Here’s some brief notes to guide your martial ponderings…

  • We started off this week’s awesomeness with a circuit of the usual kinds of calisthenics exercises: pushups, Russian twists, throwing a slam ball, passing a kickshield from hands to feet and back again while lying down, dips and burpees.
  • Thoroughly warmed up, we loosened off with some quadrupedal movement before moving onto ground mobility drills involving a variety of rolls, takedowns and padwork from different positions.
  • This week we took the drill we did last week on dealing with an attack with a stick and expanded on it with many logical progressions. Some key points to remember:
    • Once you decide you need to deploy force, and you find the right moment in which to do so, you must act immediately, efficiently and decisively.
    • Close distance and use your elbows to your advantage!
    • Get control and make sure it’s a strong grip you have. Anything less than your strongest is not good enough.
    • Act fast: strike and control.
    • You might get hit a little despite your best efforts, but there’s varying degrees of how much that’ll ruin your day. Your positioning and footwork has a lot to do with this. Train intelligently and act efficiently!
  • We also looked at some options when using a high guard against straight and hooked punches coming towards us – it’s a very versatile and efficient method of protecting yourself.
    • Regardless, we’re not about to stand there and deal with one hit at a time! Just as with the stick:
      • Close distance and gain control.
      • Striking, striking, striking…
      • Disrupt their posture and you compromise them greatly – this can be used for takedowns or truly devastating striking opportunities. Or, if possible, just a shove and your chance to run away! Remember the Force Continuum – it has to be borne in mind at all times in your training.
  • Sometimes, try as we might to avoid things getting this bad, we end up on the floor with someone trying to turn our torso from convex to concave with their feet.
    • Again, act immediately, quickly, efficiently and decisively.
    • Close distance, claw and climb your way up them. Grab whatever you find: clothes, skin, muscle, fat, hair… it doesn’t matter. Like a monkey climbing a tree. Credit to Andrew Holland (http://theselfdefenceexpert.com/) for introducing me to this very useful concept in his excellent Primal Combatives session back in 2013.
    • The closer you are to those legs, the more difficult it is for them to kick you.
    • Get up. Fast. And don’t forget that if you need to then striking can be done on the way.
    • After a tiring set of drills combining much of the aforementioned, we finished off with some percussive massage (Russian style) as a relaxation and breathwork drill.

This class is free for beginners and runs every Friday at 17:45 in Stoke-on-Trent (ST99NX). Everyone is welcome and all the details can be found here (or just click ‘Public Training’ at the top).

Training Notes – 06.02.2015

I had, as ever, an incredible time training with you all on Friday! Hope you’re all having an awesome weekend. Here’s this week’s notes on the training we did.

  • Anything can become a training tool – even balloons! Training game 1 was team keepy-uppy with balloons. More and more of them! Every time one touches the ground, pushups for all!
    • (Any drill or training game can be intensified. Be creative!)
  • The key with exercise and warmups is to ENJOY them – training game 2 was fencing with rubber sticks, while I annoyed everyone with various rules applied to the spar:
    • Left hand only,
    • You must use both hands (interesting to see how people interpret this),
    • You have to be sitting on the floor,
    • You have to keep at least half your stomach on the floor,
    • You have to lie on your back, etc
  • Taking two ideas and merging them together works very well too, and isometric tension exercises work well with ground mobility. Thus, training game 3 was plank & roll leapfrog! Persons A and B perform a plank parallel to each other, and then on command person A rolls over person B (who is still planking) and assumes a plank where he ends up, again parallel. Then on the next command person B does the same, and we go up and down the hall like that! A great tension and relaxation drill.
  • Biomechanics and footwork: getting our body weight into palm strikes and hook punches.
  • Feeling for tension and relaxation in striking: elastic recoil.
  • Relaxed movement: dealing with getting hit and getting out of the way in the first place.
    • On the attack: ‘swimming through’ the attacker.
  • Targeting and position: striking straight, up and down to good targets.
  • Knife on knife: an unlikely situation that you happen to have a knife when attacked with one, but a useful one to look at from time to time. Lots of useful concepts: disable the attacking limb, don’t go overboard if you don’t need to, maintaining contact, etc.
  • Conditioning of the knuckles and wrist for striking: gorilla crawl (knuckle version) and progressive striking drills.
  • Loosening off: a nice flow from sitting.

See you next week! All the details of this class are here.

-Josh

Free Open Snow Day Training Workshop! (Friday, 30th January, 2015)

Due to the chaos caused by a bit of snow last night, we’ve decided to do things a little differently and have ourselves an Open Snow Day Training Workshop!

Anyone and everyone is welcome to drop in any time between 17:00 and 19:00 today, and anyone who does brave the blizzards and storm the snowdrifts to get to us can have a cuppa on us too.

If it’s your first time training with us, you’re welcome to come and have your first session for free!

We’ll be covering a variety of topics, including:

  • threat awareness
  • threat evaluation
  • threat avoidance
  • management of (and awareness of) personal space and positioning
  • preparations for taking action
  • upper-body and lower-body striking
  • power generation and impact management
  • ground mobility
  • escapes
  • parrying, jamming and blocking
  • throws, takedowns and breaking posture
  • problem-solving in combative situations
  • dealing with armed assault: surviving attacks with blunt and edged weapons

We train at The Wesley Methodist Church hall, Leek New Road, Stockton Brook, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, ST9 9NX and usually our training session is 17:45-18:45 every Friday.

All welcome as are your questions! Don’t forget – this is all free if it’s your first time so feel free to drop in, have a cuppa and learn something about what we do.

You can reach me at 01782502684 (landline) or 07981175878 (mobile but I’ll have negligible signal until about 16:00 or so), or on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/EvolutionarySelfProtection .

I made an event on Facebook for it: http://www.facebook.com/events/1531366307150866
And one on Streetlife! http://www.streetlife.com/conversation/d95jspv6e2el/

See you later!

-Josh Nixon

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