Training Log–January 2013

As you all know by now, the CSPS is an evolutionary concept and I pretty much apply that philosophy to everything I do, including my writing. At least, that’s the excuse I’m going to use for my complete and utter laziness of late with these training logs. As the year has become busier and busier with training, teaching and research (alongside everything else in life), I’ve found myself writing training logs later and later after the sessions themselves, and sometimes just not finding the time. As a result, I’m going to do them as a kind of newsletter format where I aggregate all the training news from the CSPS into one monthly little post like this. Any questions on CSPS training are, as always, more than welcome any time as this is primarily for you, the reader, to see what it is that we get up to!

January’s been a great month this year for change and progress, especially at PHDefence in Stockton Brook. With their newly-stabilised payment structure, there’s guaranteed training for their students every week regardless of numbers attending, which has pushed forward a period of great progress in this stability for their students. They’ve even got a new student who’s making great progress, and a couple of students who should be ready to grade soon so it’s a very exciting time for them!

At PHDefence, the higher grades have been focussing on their weapons techniques a lot, particularly the use of the long stick (Jō staff and Bō staff for the more traditionally-minded). So far it’s been mostly stick acclimatisation drills and basic striking as this weapon’s new to them, but soon they’ll be progressing to more in-depth stick usage. They’ve also been doing some aerial coordination drills as a preliminary to their spinning and aerial kicks.

I’ve said this before, but I’ll just say it again here, especially with talk of the spinning and aerial kicking:

I’ll just take a moment to explain what PHDefence is and what my relationship with it is. PHDefence is a local martial arts class, based in Stockton Brook at the moment though it’s been all over the place through the years. It’s owned and was founded by Shifu Paul Horrobin, who created a hybridised martial art mostly based on concepts from Wing Chun (yǒngchūn ~ 咏春 ~ ‘Spring Chant’), Jun Fan Jeet Kune Do (zhènfān jiéquándào ~ 振藩截拳道 ~ ‘Jun Fan’s “Way of the Intercepting Fist”’) and Shaolin Kung Fu (shàolín gōng fū ~ 少林功夫 ~ ‘Young Forest Kung Fu’) among others. The basic premise of what they do there is the attempt to take traditional martial arts concepts and make them practical while retaining their martial-arts focus. I just want to make clear here that they are not a self-defence or self-protection class, and that while I am a self-protection instructor while I’m teaching there I’m also a martial arts instructor. I alternate between teaching and training there every other week, with Paul teaching every other lesson. While on occasion I mix in odd concepts and training ideas from the CSPS, this is not a CSPS class. The reason I take such steps to make this clear is that I would hate for someone to read a PHDefence training log and think I was equating the martial arts training described to practical self-protection training, which it is not. Worse, I would hate for someone to read it and think that the training described was self-protective in nature.

Now that the perfunctory disclaimer’s over, I can get on with the actual point of the post! I won’t do that every time, don’t worry – I’ll just point people here if there’s confusion. I only make the point as it’s so important (to me) that martial arts and self-protection are never confused, and I realise that text on a screen can easily be written badly and misunderstood.

The snow’s been a constant source of amusement and difficulties, but as my friend (and excellent Systema instructor) Rob Poyton mentioned in a recent YouTube video, these difficulties only present opportunities if you approach your training with an indomitable warrior mindset. Whereas for PHDefence the problem was merely students getting to the session and needing to dry their feet, for CSPS students the opportunities for development were more apparent as we were training primarily outside!

Chris returned to his long-term training recently, and so we got straight to the point with a lot of drills involving use of the shoulder, elbow striking, hammer fists, knee striking and I don’t even know how many other striking methods. Taking an initial contact as a reference point, we used a set framework of movements to efficiently train the different muscle groups of the body to work together efficiently to present a functional combative response.

(What that means is, the pad got bashed hard, fast and lots!)

For Chris, the focus has been on brushing off the rust of Christmas and sharpening up the basic concepts of the CSPS with a slew of new approaches to the same things to further increase the adaptability of their application.

For Matt, the focus has been on initial training of the basic concepts, and I really must say how proud I am of both students with their continued effort and skyrocketing progress week on week.

Other students preferred not to be named, unless you count my brother Jake, with whom I just fight, and that’s pretty much his training most of the time! We just fight. That’s what brothers are for, right?

February’s been an amazing month so far but I’ll elaborate more on that next time!

All the best,

FCIns. Josh Nixon, CSPS

PHDefence Training Log–04.01.2012

IMAG0206This is a belated post, I do apologise. PHDefence training logs likely will be often as training is 19:00-21:00, I always remain available for questions and general chat afterwards and the venue for them is a chapel so there’s a load of chairs to put back in rows afterwards in the hall they use. As a result, by the time I get home all I want to do is eat, sleep and watch Coronation Street! Yes, a self-protection instructor watches Coronation Street with his dinner. Shush!

In this first training log for PHDefence of 2013 (I still keep typing ‘2012’ first), I’ll just take a moment to explain what PHDefence is and what my relationship with it is. PHDefence is a local martial arts class, based in Stockton Brook at the moment though it’s been all over the place through the years. It’s owned and was founded by Shifu Paul Horrobin, who created a hybridised martial art mostly based on concepts from Wing Chun (yǒngchūn ~ 咏春 ~ ‘Spring Chant’), Jun Fan Jeet Kune Do (zhènfān jiéquándào ~ 振藩截拳道 ~ ‘Jun Fan’s “Way of the Intercepting Fist”’) and Shaolin Kung Fu (shàolín gōng fū ~ 少林功夫 ~ ‘Young Forest Kung Fu’) among others. The basic premise of what they do there is the attempt to take traditional martial arts concepts and make them practical while retaining their martial-arts focus. I just want to make clear here that they are not a self-defence or self-protection class, and that while I am a self-protection instructor while I’m teaching there I’m also a martial arts instructor. I alternate between teaching and training there every other week, with Paul teaching every other lesson. While on occasion I mix in odd concepts and training ideas from the CSPS, this is not a CSPS class. The reason I take such steps to make this clear is that I would hate for someone to read a PHDefence training log and think I was equating the martial arts training described to practical self-protection training, which it is not. Worse, I would hate for someone to read it and think that the training described was self-protective in nature.

Now that the perfunctory disclaimer’s over, I can get on with the actual point of the post! I won’t do that every time, don’t worry – I’ll just point people here if there’s confusion.

So on Friday night it was PHDefence’s first session back after Christmas, and they’re all working towards their next gradings. At the moment they have someone on the first grading (Red), two on the seventh grading (Brown) and one on the sixth (Blue) who are all now ready to work on the concepts for their next grading. It’s quite an exciting time for PHDefence at the moment!

We started off with some simple combat-oriented fitness drills: 30-second rounds of simple wind sprints, then the same in pairs with student-chosen combinations at the end on focus mitts. After that we dropped the focus mitts and picked up some kickshields for the same again with kicking combinations at the ends of the sprints, again student-chosen. After those we went through some rounds of communally-chosen exercises where each student had a turn choosing an exercise to add to the session. This proactive approach allows the students to work out what works best and elect movements that flow concomitantly themselves, which adds greatly to the quality of their martial decision making.

Following from this initial section we went through some rounds of chisao (chīshǒu ~ 黐手 ~ ‘sticking hands’) for close-in sensitivity training, before widening out the range to a Systema-style slow spar. Then at random timings I handed one partner a stick which had the effect of both increasing and decreasing the range of the partner work at different times.

Afterwards, a section of choice modules was enjoyed where each student chose a drill for everyone to do. This ranged from kicking padwork drills to bouts of Jujutsu-style back-to-back groundfighting. Everyone’s choices came together very well to make a most enjoyable session.

At the end there was a module of basic aerial coordination drills for the higher grades as a preliminary to spinning and aerial kicks, and for the lower grades a few rounds of different padwork drills from sitting on a chair. To wrap up on a high note, a very enjoyable padwork drill using the shields for lower-body and then upper-body striking inspired by some videos I’ll be reviewing shortly from the British Combat Association – those reviews are going out every Tuesday morning so make sure to keep your eyes open!

It was awesome to see you all again.

Until next time,
FCIns. Josh Nixon, CSPS

CSPS Seminar Writeup–Endon Scouts, 19.10.2012: Night Safety for Children

Last night I had the pleasure of being invited down to Endon Scout Group’s headquarters where I gave a two-hour introductory seminar on staying safe at night for children. This is more a reference for anyone who attended than anything else, but it may be interesting for parents wondering what their son or daughter did on Friday too.

First off, I just want to thank everyone involved for the warm welcome and excellent atmosphere throughout. The kids, parents and staff that I spoke to were excellent and made us feel very welcome. The whole evening was an absolute pleasure!

We started off with a quick run through basic ideas of respect, honesty and awareness. Here’s a few points for your reference:

  • Respect: All CSPS sessions are based on a system of constant and mutual respect between all present. It’s not ‘teacher and student’, and not ‘adult and some kids’ but a group of people training together. Respect is earned, but we all deserve it the same as everyone else.
  • Honesty: Honesty with yourself is vital. If you don’t know why you’re training something, or can’t work out whether it’s going to work or not, then you have to be honest with yourself and accept that you don’t know! Then you need to be honest with your instructor and ask your questions! Honesty with yourself also means accepting your limitations as well as your strengths, and examining your attitude and mindset too. Honesty with your parents is also vital! If anything happens – whether it’s a small incident of bullying at school, a big incident of bullying at school, or an adult who tried to take you somewhere, or anything else that you didn’t like, you must be completely honest with your parents/guardians about what happened, in as much detail as you can manage! If the police are involved, no matter what happened again you must remain completely honest in every detail!
  • Awareness: Here’s the colour-code system that we played with last night:

White: Unaware. Able to be bashed without seeing it coming. Don’t be in this state unless you’re asleep!
Yellow: Threat awareness. Looking around, listening, etc. Not paranoid or scared – relaxed, but observing everything. Ready. Be in this all the time.
Orange: Threat evaluation. You see something you’re not happy about – whatever it is, and whether or not you know why you’re unhappy about it – and you start evaluating and thinking about what to do. You may cross the street, go the other way, find a safer route, etc. Still calm.
Red: Threat avoidance. You may need to run or hide. You may need to de-escalate by talking someone out of their anger, etc. You may even need to pre-emptively strike or similar in order to make your escape opportunity.
Black: Survival. This may be running, or hiding again, or it may be fighting tooth and nail to survive. A bad situation you really need to escape from ASAP.

This system isn’t mine – it was made by a man called Jeff Cooper, who I’ve never spoken to but I’ve heard many good things about. I’d recommend researching him if you’re interested. This is just my take on the concept, and may differ from some other people’s.

After that we got into the physical combatives focussed around striking and getting out of grabs predominantly. Then we drilled running away from someone insisting that we show them to a place. If you take nothing else away from our brief little session, remember this:

YOU SHOULD NEVER ALLOW ANYONE TO TRY AND TAKE YOU ANYWHERE. Your social awkwardness around saying ‘no’, not holding someone’s hand or running away without being physically attacked MUST BE IGNORED! I cannot stress this strongly enough. Social awkwardness will not save you! Leave it for social situations. Someone trying to commit a crime on you is not a social situation (depending on how we’re using the term), and as such the rules of social interaction such as awkwardness in particular do not apply!

Then we had question time, which seemed to be preoccupied mostly with what to do if you end up killing somebody! Funny as it may be to be asked that a few different times in a few different ways (especially the acid bath question made me laugh! Ahh, dark humour…), it’s a perfectly valid and important question. To simplify, I refer you back to the previous stuff about honesty. When telling your parents and the police in that situation what has happened, honesty is what you need.

What I will do for you when I get the chance is ask a police officer I know what exactly should be your considerations in a situation like that. Until then, I recommend a book called ‘Understanding Reasonable Force’ by Mark Dawes. Full details of the book, with review and room for discussion can be found on the CSPS forum –> Resources –> Literature at http://cspsonline.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=literature&action=display&thread=144 and you can get it easily on eBay or Amazon. Another recommendation I have on the legal side of things is to simply call the police on the non-emergency number (101) and ask! If there’s anyone who can give you advice on these things, it’s them. I’m a self-protection instructor, but not a police officer and not a legal advisor, so I really do encourage you to make your own enquiries.

Any questions, comments, etc are welcome and you all have my contact details. Thanks for an awesome night and I hope to see you again soon!

FCIns. Josh Nixon of the CSPS is at Stoke College’s Disability Day–25th of April 2012

On Wednesday the 25th of April 2012 FCIns. Josh Nixon (that’s me) will be representing the Combative Self-Protection System at Stoke College’s ‘Disability Day’. From 10:00-14:00 you’ll have the opportunity to speak with me and I’ll answer any questions you have about the CSPS or training in general. Details are also on our events page.

The event will be held at Cauldon Campus on Stoke Road, Shelton, ST4 2DG, in the Sports Hall from 10:00-14:00 on Wednesday the 25th of April 2012.

Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service have said on their site:

The aim of the event is to raise disability awareness and provide information, advice and guidance to individuals within the college and the general public. There will be over 60 organisations on hand to provide the most up to date information on a range of disability issues to an eager audience and the celebrity guests will be ‘Race2Recovery’ who have recently been on the BBC’s Top Gear.

(From http://www.staffordshirefire.gov.uk/2091.asp on 14.04.2012.)

It’s going to be a great opportunity to speak with a lot of interesting organisations and individuals so I heartily recommend coming and taking a look – everyone’s welcome! I’ll be on hand for the full four hours to answer all of your questions on training with or without disabilities for self-protection, health, fitness and personal security. I’ll also be representing local martial arts class PHDefence, which I am Co-Instructor of. There may be an offer available to people who attend this event…

See you there!

-FCIns. Josh Nixon, CSPS

P.S. There may also be sweets…

101–The New UK Non-Emergency Police Number

imageHi all,

Just a quick update from the police again – the non-emergency number has changed (or will be changing, depending on where you are) to 101. You may be wondering when you should call 999, and when you should call 101.

When to call 101?
You should call 101 to report less urgent crime and disorder or to speak to your local officers.
For example, you should call 101 if:

  • Your car has been stolen
  • Your property has been damaged
  • You suspect drug use or dealing in your neighbourhood

Or to:

  • Report a minor traffic collision
  • Give the police information about crime in your area
  • Speak to the police about a general enquiry

This is a replacement for the old local one, which was 03001234455. ‘Calls to 101 (from both landlines and mobile networks) cost 15 pence per call, no matter what time of day you call, or how long you are on the phone. Everyone calling the police for non-emergency matters will now know exactly how much a call will cost them, and can be assured of equal access whether they are on a pay-as-you-go mobile or a home landline.’

Those who are deaf, hard of hearing or speech-impaired can textphone 18001 101.

More information can be found at http://www.police.uk/101 (image courtesy of here).

A list of alternative non-emergency numbers can be found at http://www.police.uk/alternative-non-emergency-numbers along with other useful ones like the British Transport Police, Crimestoppers, Anti-Terrorist Hotline, the NSPCC and a victim support line.

Assault in Tunstall – Police Looking for Witnesses

Just spreading the word to help out with this one:

Officers were called to Furlong Road at around 10.30pm on Friday 30 September following a report of a fight.

A 15-year-old boy had sustained a head injury and was taken to the University Hospital of North Staffordshire for treatment. He was discharged a short time later.

A 45-year old man suffered a broken jaw and was taken to Aintree Hospital in Liverpool for specialist treatment. He was discharged yesterday, Sunday 2 October. He has been arrested in connection with the incident and has been bailed, pending further inquiries, to a date later this month.

Police are looking for witnesses, so if anyone noticed anything around that area on the day then please get in touch with them:

Anyone with information is urged to contact DC Louise Giles at Staffordshire Police on 0300 123 4455 quoting incident number 955 of September 30 or Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

Issued: 03/10/2011           Contact name: DC Louise Giles           Contact number: 0300 123 4455
Crime reference number: 955 of 30/09/2011

The article, found at http://www.staffordshire.police.uk/news/latest_appeals/111003_ic_assault_tunstall/?view=Standard&utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=twitterfeed says that the area was busy due to people being out enjoying the hot weather, so there should be at least one person who knows something!

Don’t forget that the weather should be a consideration in your self-evaluation of your own personal security – do you think about it? Join the discussion on the CSPS forums at http://cspsonline.proboards.com for more on this.

New Home Needed for Local Boxing Academy

image

The Blue Glove Boxing Academy, which is run by Staffordshire Police officers, is in need of a new home in Stoke-on-Trent.

Boxing sessions are currently held on an ad-hoc basis at the Wallace Centre in Abbey Hulton, but the Academy wants to set up a permanent base of its own which can be used during the day, in the evening and at weekends.

PCs Colin Gay and Steve Marsh run the Academy, and earlier this year organised a charity boxing event which went on to raise more than £32,000 for the Blue Lamp Foundation – the emergency services charity set up by injured PC David Rathband. The Academy regularly hosts sessions for young people, which helps to develop their fitness and discipline and is a useful diversionary tactic away from anti-social behaviour. Having a permanent base would enable more such sessions to be organised.

It’s always good to remember that things like boxing aren’t just about hitting pads and people! The benefits to combative training of all kinds are both numerous and substantial.

“We are looking for new premises we can call home,” said PC Gay. “Ideally we are after a floor of a building that is not being used and which we can access daily. It needs to be spacious so we can install a ring and other boxing equipment, and ideally situated in Stoke-on-Trent. If we are successful in finding a new base our aim is to deliver more training sessions to young people to engage them in positive activity, and away from anti-social behaviour.”

Anyone who can provide a new home for the Blue Glove Boxing Academy is asked to contact PC Gay at Staffordshire Police on 0300 123 4455 .

Can you help them out? Any ideas? Please get in touch with them if you can – Stoke-on-Trent could use some more youth activities, especially of this kind.

Here’s the original article: http://www.staffordshire.police.uk/news/news_releases/110928_ie_boxing_academy/?view=Standard

Image courtesy of http://reviews.costco.ca/2070-en_ca/10300708/everlast-everlast-14-oz-blue-boxing-gloves-reviews/reviews.htm

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