Training Notes – 20.02.2015

IMAG0206.jpgAs always, this week’s class was a lot of fun! Many thanks as always to everyone who came and we hope to see everyone else again soon! The sheer skill and natural ability I saw this week was phenomenal. Everyone did exceptionally well and should be extremely proud of their progress and prowess.

Here’s some brief notes to guide your martial ponderings…

  • We started off this week’s awesomeness with a circuit of the usual kinds of calisthenics exercises: pushups, Russian twists, throwing a slam ball, passing a kickshield from hands to feet and back again while lying down, dips and burpees.
  • Thoroughly warmed up, we loosened off with some quadrupedal movement before moving onto ground mobility drills involving a variety of rolls, takedowns and padwork from different positions.
  • This week we took the drill we did last week on dealing with an attack with a stick and expanded on it with many logical progressions. Some key points to remember:
    • Once you decide you need to deploy force, and you find the right moment in which to do so, you must act immediately, efficiently and decisively.
    • Close distance and use your elbows to your advantage!
    • Get control and make sure it’s a strong grip you have. Anything less than your strongest is not good enough.
    • Act fast: strike and control.
    • You might get hit a little despite your best efforts, but there’s varying degrees of how much that’ll ruin your day. Your positioning and footwork has a lot to do with this. Train intelligently and act efficiently!
  • We also looked at some options when using a high guard against straight and hooked punches coming towards us – it’s a very versatile and efficient method of protecting yourself.
    • Regardless, we’re not about to stand there and deal with one hit at a time! Just as with the stick:
      • Close distance and gain control.
      • Striking, striking, striking…
      • Disrupt their posture and you compromise them greatly – this can be used for takedowns or truly devastating striking opportunities. Or, if possible, just a shove and your chance to run away! Remember the Force Continuum – it has to be borne in mind at all times in your training.
  • Sometimes, try as we might to avoid things getting this bad, we end up on the floor with someone trying to turn our torso from convex to concave with their feet.
    • Again, act immediately, quickly, efficiently and decisively.
    • Close distance, claw and climb your way up them. Grab whatever you find: clothes, skin, muscle, fat, hair… it doesn’t matter. Like a monkey climbing a tree. Credit to Andrew Holland (http://theselfdefenceexpert.com/) for introducing me to this very useful concept in his excellent Primal Combatives session back in 2013.
    • The closer you are to those legs, the more difficult it is for them to kick you.
    • Get up. Fast. And don’t forget that if you need to then striking can be done on the way.
    • After a tiring set of drills combining much of the aforementioned, we finished off with some percussive massage (Russian style) as a relaxation and breathwork drill.

This class is free for beginners and runs every Friday at 17:45 in Stoke-on-Trent (ST99NX). Everyone is welcome and all the details can be found here (or just click ‘Public Training’ at the top).

Training Notes – 13.02.2015

IMG_20150214_121842A quiet week this week but a good session nonetheless! A warm welcome to our newest member who did exceptionally well with the hammer fist striking we worked on! Very natural movement and stable posture all round.

  • Taking a simple exercise and making it horrible: shifting weight forwards, backwards or sideways to change the emphasis with our pushups, and holding exercises such as pushups and squats isometrically.
  • Striking we looked at: palm strikes, hammer fists and turning elbow strikes. To recap:
    • Palm strikes are relatively low-risk strikes that are easy to employ. They can generate lots of power and hit lots of nerve endings all at once, so can be quite disorienting and shocking. You can also grab on straight away once you’ve hit. They’re quick too.
    • Hammer fists are powerful and also relatively quite low-risk to the striker.
    • Elbow strikes are devastating, quite easy to employ and are very useful when close up.
  • Impact development: feeling the weight of your arm and relaxed striking movements.
  • Dealing with impact and pushes: relaxed movement, joint mobility and footwork. Angles and directions.
  • Working against armed assaults: a simple drill against a stick being swung at your head and a similar concept being applied against a very common knife attack situation: grabbing the shirt and stabbing towards the stomach with the rear hand.
    • Gaining control of the armed arm (haha) and testing how much control we have.
    • Finding opportunities to strike and get away.
    • Taking the stick and striking with it if we need to (see: Force Continuum).
  • Breathwork drill for awareness of tension and relaxation.

All of this came together into a nice training session with a clear objective in mind when dealing with the attacks we looked at: to escape (safely). We had a new student this week who took on the concepts we explored quickly and easily with very nice, natural movement. Many thanks also to Chris for providing such exemplary (devastating) striking to discuss!

I hope you all have an awesome weekend and thanks for coming. See you next week!

Details of this class can be found here.

Josh

Training Notes – 06.02.2015

I had, as ever, an incredible time training with you all on Friday! Hope you’re all having an awesome weekend. Here’s this week’s notes on the training we did.

  • Anything can become a training tool – even balloons! Training game 1 was team keepy-uppy with balloons. More and more of them! Every time one touches the ground, pushups for all!
    • (Any drill or training game can be intensified. Be creative!)
  • The key with exercise and warmups is to ENJOY them – training game 2 was fencing with rubber sticks, while I annoyed everyone with various rules applied to the spar:
    • Left hand only,
    • You must use both hands (interesting to see how people interpret this),
    • You have to be sitting on the floor,
    • You have to keep at least half your stomach on the floor,
    • You have to lie on your back, etc
  • Taking two ideas and merging them together works very well too, and isometric tension exercises work well with ground mobility. Thus, training game 3 was plank & roll leapfrog! Persons A and B perform a plank parallel to each other, and then on command person A rolls over person B (who is still planking) and assumes a plank where he ends up, again parallel. Then on the next command person B does the same, and we go up and down the hall like that! A great tension and relaxation drill.
  • Biomechanics and footwork: getting our body weight into palm strikes and hook punches.
  • Feeling for tension and relaxation in striking: elastic recoil.
  • Relaxed movement: dealing with getting hit and getting out of the way in the first place.
    • On the attack: ‘swimming through’ the attacker.
  • Targeting and position: striking straight, up and down to good targets.
  • Knife on knife: an unlikely situation that you happen to have a knife when attacked with one, but a useful one to look at from time to time. Lots of useful concepts: disable the attacking limb, don’t go overboard if you don’t need to, maintaining contact, etc.
  • Conditioning of the knuckles and wrist for striking: gorilla crawl (knuckle version) and progressive striking drills.
  • Loosening off: a nice flow from sitting.

See you next week! All the details of this class are here.

-Josh

Free Open Snow Day Training Workshop! (Friday, 30th January, 2015)

Due to the chaos caused by a bit of snow last night, we’ve decided to do things a little differently and have ourselves an Open Snow Day Training Workshop!

Anyone and everyone is welcome to drop in any time between 17:00 and 19:00 today, and anyone who does brave the blizzards and storm the snowdrifts to get to us can have a cuppa on us too.

If it’s your first time training with us, you’re welcome to come and have your first session for free!

We’ll be covering a variety of topics, including:

  • threat awareness
  • threat evaluation
  • threat avoidance
  • management of (and awareness of) personal space and positioning
  • preparations for taking action
  • upper-body and lower-body striking
  • power generation and impact management
  • ground mobility
  • escapes
  • parrying, jamming and blocking
  • throws, takedowns and breaking posture
  • problem-solving in combative situations
  • dealing with armed assault: surviving attacks with blunt and edged weapons

We train at The Wesley Methodist Church hall, Leek New Road, Stockton Brook, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, ST9 9NX and usually our training session is 17:45-18:45 every Friday.

All welcome as are your questions! Don’t forget – this is all free if it’s your first time so feel free to drop in, have a cuppa and learn something about what we do.

You can reach me at 01782502684 (landline) or 07981175878 (mobile but I’ll have negligible signal until about 16:00 or so), or on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/EvolutionarySelfProtection .

I made an event on Facebook for it: http://www.facebook.com/events/1531366307150866
And one on Streetlife! http://www.streetlife.com/conversation/d95jspv6e2el/

See you later!

-Josh Nixon

Review: ‘Ultimate Self-Defence Seminar’ by Peter Consterdine and Geoff Thompson

Consterdine, Peter and Thompson, Geoff. Ultimate Self-Defence Seminar. Protection Publications. 2005.

Review: Ultimate Self-Defence Seminar:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

This video is one of those well-known ones, considered essential by many, that you often hear about as an instructor. There’s good reason for that.

‘Action beats reaction’ – this is the key understanding that makes Geoff and Peter’s approach so much better than most when it comes to self-protection. Peter makes this point with a little demonstration of blocking’s uselessness in a reactive manner after a simple warmup of exercises chiefly concerned with coordination. He goes on to give what I consider the best explanation of the double-hip method of striking I’ve ever seen. There’s similarities between this and Systema’s waveform striking, which is definitely worth looking into as well if you like this method of power generation. I definitely do. It works very nicely for me, especially for body shots.

Following from this, Peter goes on to discuss and demonstrate sections on: speed and the flinch response, pre-emptive striking, UK self-defence law, adrenaline and the physiological biochemical responses of stress, pre-planning for violence, the effects of mind-altering chemicals, effective punchbag training, dialogue training, palm striking, the issues around striking with the knuckles to the face, lining up an aggressor, the biomechanics of efficient striking, zanshin, footwork, distance’s effect on striking opportunities, and the effects of surprise and shock on striking efficacy.

‘There’s no growth in comfort.’ I’ve got that up in the garage with my punchbag. For the second half, Geoff Thompson takes over and begins with hook punching on the pads, then a drill of striking with restricted movement. Afterwards, Geoff goes on to discuss and demonstrate sections on: fear and discomfort, double-hip striking towards the face, verbal distraction and deception with pre-emptive striking, usage of ‘the fence’ and shows of aggression, dynamic biomechanics in kicking (with Peter Consterdine), bodyweight grappling drills, foot tripping and trapping drills, striking from positions of biomechanical disadvantage, throwing and groundfighting, the importance of reading and learning, and attitudinal changes that are beneficial to training and to combat.

This really is a gem of a video. I personally find it quite motivational to listen to aside from the training ideas it offers. I highly recommend this one in particular as a worthy addition to any instructor’s shelf. Moreover, I would recommend this to students and prospective students too – if your instructor or prospective instructor doesn’t discuss any the kinds of things shown in this video (or especially if they’re ignorant of the concepts) then chances are they’re not worth your time. That’s a strong thing to say, I realise, but I feel that the quality of the basic information and sentiment behind this video’s content is substantial enough to warrant such a statement. The bottom line: watch this.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found at http://peterconsterdine.com/ultimatesd.htm.

Review: ‘Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Seminar’ by Peter Consterdine

Consterdine, Peter. Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Seminar. Protection Publications. 2007.

Review: Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Seminar:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

No messing around, this video starts as it means to go on with some impact development on the pads. As is usual with a British Combat Association production, a very important point is raised early on; that we shouldn’t be hesitant (and thus inefficient) when attacking. Instead, we should make sure that everything we do ‘explodes’; that it’s fast, committed and decisive.

The video goes on to cover stance length and the issues around it, relaxation for impact development in kicking, footwork and biomechanics in kicking, concomitancy when kicking alongside upper-body striking, exposure time and timing in striking, kicking at close ranges, Wing Chun (詠春 ~ yǒng chūn) tactile sensitivity drills (Sticking Hands ~ 黐手 ~ chī shǒu), parrying and blocking drills, recovery and commitment in kicking, intensity, adrenaline, stress, context and setting.

The DVD is unique in that this is the first full seminar Peter has given which covers his own high level martial arts training. Renowned for the “double hip” generating power of his strikes and kicks, this seminar, covered how power is generated and explosive speed with maximum dynamic movement and aggression. All this is shown as well as the key elements in the ultra-fast transitions from punching to kicking and vice versa.

(Information from http://peterconsterdine.com/pctraining.htm on 28.02.2013)

This video, in summary, demonstrates a group of men and women taking part in some excellent martial arts training. What sets it aside from other such videos is that it’s done with intensity. My advice to anyone who feels their training is missing something in terms of intensity is to watch this and take on the general feeling of motivation. Essentially, as Peter says at the end, this training session only has a few basic things in it: jabs, crosses, hooks, uppercuts and roundhouse kicks more or less. However, the crucial understanding is how they train these basic things at the British Combat Association.

Assistant Instructors who took part in this seminar include Steve Williams, Iain Abernethy, John Skillen and Peter Lakin.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found at http://peterconsterdine.com/pctraining.htm.

Training Log–January 2013

As you all know by now, the CSPS is an evolutionary concept and I pretty much apply that philosophy to everything I do, including my writing. At least, that’s the excuse I’m going to use for my complete and utter laziness of late with these training logs. As the year has become busier and busier with training, teaching and research (alongside everything else in life), I’ve found myself writing training logs later and later after the sessions themselves, and sometimes just not finding the time. As a result, I’m going to do them as a kind of newsletter format where I aggregate all the training news from the CSPS into one monthly little post like this. Any questions on CSPS training are, as always, more than welcome any time as this is primarily for you, the reader, to see what it is that we get up to!

January’s been a great month this year for change and progress, especially at PHDefence in Stockton Brook. With their newly-stabilised payment structure, there’s guaranteed training for their students every week regardless of numbers attending, which has pushed forward a period of great progress in this stability for their students. They’ve even got a new student who’s making great progress, and a couple of students who should be ready to grade soon so it’s a very exciting time for them!

At PHDefence, the higher grades have been focussing on their weapons techniques a lot, particularly the use of the long stick (Jō staff and Bō staff for the more traditionally-minded). So far it’s been mostly stick acclimatisation drills and basic striking as this weapon’s new to them, but soon they’ll be progressing to more in-depth stick usage. They’ve also been doing some aerial coordination drills as a preliminary to their spinning and aerial kicks.

I’ve said this before, but I’ll just say it again here, especially with talk of the spinning and aerial kicking:

I’ll just take a moment to explain what PHDefence is and what my relationship with it is. PHDefence is a local martial arts class, based in Stockton Brook at the moment though it’s been all over the place through the years. It’s owned and was founded by Shifu Paul Horrobin, who created a hybridised martial art mostly based on concepts from Wing Chun (yǒngchūn ~ 咏春 ~ ‘Spring Chant’), Jun Fan Jeet Kune Do (zhènfān jiéquándào ~ 振藩截拳道 ~ ‘Jun Fan’s “Way of the Intercepting Fist”’) and Shaolin Kung Fu (shàolín gōng fū ~ 少林功夫 ~ ‘Young Forest Kung Fu’) among others. The basic premise of what they do there is the attempt to take traditional martial arts concepts and make them practical while retaining their martial-arts focus. I alternate between teaching and training there every other week, with Paul teaching every other lesson. While on occasion I mix in odd concepts and training ideas from the CSPS, this is not a CSPS class.

The snow’s been a constant source of amusement and difficulties, but as my friend (and excellent Systema instructor) Rob Poyton mentioned in a recent YouTube video, these difficulties only present opportunities if you approach your training with an indomitable warrior mindset. Whereas for PHDefence the problem was merely students getting to the session and needing to dry their feet, for CSPS students the opportunities for development were more apparent as we were training primarily outside!

Chris returned to his long-term training recently, and so we got straight to the point with a lot of drills involving use of the shoulder, elbow striking, hammer fists, knee striking and I don’t even know how many other striking methods. Taking an initial contact as a reference point, we used a set framework of movements to efficiently train the different muscle groups of the body to work together efficiently to present a functional combative response.

(What that means is, the pad got bashed hard, fast and lots!)

For Chris, the focus has been on brushing off the rust of Christmas and sharpening up the basic concepts of the CSPS with a slew of new approaches to the same things to further increase the adaptability of their application.

For Matt, the focus has been on initial training of the basic concepts, and I really must say how proud I am of both students with their continued effort and skyrocketing progress week on week.

Other students preferred not to be named, unless you count my brother Jake, with whom I just fight, and that’s pretty much his training most of the time! We just fight. That’s what brothers are for, right?

February’s been an amazing month so far but I’ll elaborate more on that next time!

All the best,

FCIns. Josh Nixon, CSPS

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