Review: ‘Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Seminar’ by Peter Consterdine

Consterdine, Peter. Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Seminar. Protection Publications. 2007.

Review: Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Seminar:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

No messing around, this video starts as it means to go on with some impact development on the pads. As is usual with a British Combat Association production, a very important point is raised early on; that we shouldn’t be hesitant (and thus inefficient) when attacking. Instead, we should make sure that everything we do ‘explodes’; that it’s fast, committed and decisive.

The video goes on to cover stance length and the issues around it, relaxation for impact development in kicking, footwork and biomechanics in kicking, concomitancy when kicking alongside upper-body striking, exposure time and timing in striking, kicking at close ranges, Wing Chun (詠春 ~ yǒng chūn) tactile sensitivity drills (Sticking Hands ~ 黐手 ~ chī shǒu), parrying and blocking drills, recovery and commitment in kicking, intensity, adrenaline, stress, context and setting.

The DVD is unique in that this is the first full seminar Peter has given which covers his own high level martial arts training. Renowned for the “double hip” generating power of his strikes and kicks, this seminar, covered how power is generated and explosive speed with maximum dynamic movement and aggression. All this is shown as well as the key elements in the ultra-fast transitions from punching to kicking and vice versa.

(Information from http://peterconsterdine.com/pctraining.htm on 28.02.2013)

This video, in summary, demonstrates a group of men and women taking part in some excellent martial arts training. What sets it aside from other such videos is that it’s done with intensity. My advice to anyone who feels their training is missing something in terms of intensity is to watch this and take on the general feeling of motivation. Essentially, as Peter says at the end, this training session only has a few basic things in it: jabs, crosses, hooks, uppercuts and roundhouse kicks more or less. However, the crucial understanding is how they train these basic things at the British Combat Association.

Assistant Instructors who took part in this seminar include Steve Williams, Iain Abernethy, John Skillen and Peter Lakin.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found at http://peterconsterdine.com/pctraining.htm.

Martial Art? Combat Sport? Self-Defence? Self-Protection? What’s the difference? Why does it matter?

By Josh Nixon, ESP

Please note: This article is now outdated. It is merely retained here for archive purposes, so the changing nature of things here can be seen by all. Consider the following just my older thoughts on the matter, from which the current ones have come.

Here is the updated version of things: http://evolutionaryselfprotection.wikia.com/wiki/Self-Protection

In discussions of different training systems, it becomes immediately apparent after a quick Google or a sift through YouTube that the terms used in the title of this article are used more or less interchangeably by a great many people. This may seem unimportant, but it is becoming a big issue in the martial arts community today. In an attempt to help with this problem, and also to clarify my use of these terms online and offline, I thought it would be useful to produce a short list of these terms, and how I would define them, with some examples of common traits. Note that the following is merely my personal use of these terms, and other peoples’ usage of them will vary, as they are of course completely free to do so.

Martial Art: A martial art is exactly what the name suggests – an art. An art is a method of expression through application of creativity, and is typically concerned with aesthetics. As such, martial arts are often concerned with aesthetics, historical traditions, cultural customs and philosophy. These systems will often focus most of their training on one aspect of fighting, though not always. Martial arts can be traditional or modern, and different systems are often mixed into hybrid systems, usually in order to address what the instructors feel is a shortcoming of their original system. These are often termed Mixed Martial Arts (MMA), though this term is now used more for combat sports systems so many adopt the alternative term Hybrid Martial Arts (HMA) to avoid confusion. Martial arts can be thought of as a method of self-perfection rather than necessarily self-protection, though of course all martial arts training will have some real combative merit, and will often be extremely potent systems with which to protect oneself, so they should be respected as such.

Combat Sport: A combat sport is, again, exactly what the name suggests. If a system focuses on competition then it is a combat sport. These systems are often characterised by points-based sparring, where points may be awarded according to damage dealt, submission, knockout, etc or on aesthetic grounds, for example. Tournaments are often held on a regular basis, and the more well-known ones are the ones you see on TV and online. If training is focussed solely on fitness with any combative merits being considered secondary then that system could also be considered a combat sport.

Self-Defence: Self-Defence is where this topic gets confused on a regular basis, and arguably where it matters a little more pressingly. Self-Defence is a term used for reactive systems that are geared towards dealing with a combative situation by reacting to a physical attack. This includes Reality-Based Self-Defence (RBSD) systems. These systems are not concerned with aesthetics, historical traditions, cultural customs or philosophy.

Self-Protection: Self-Protection is a term used for systems that, in addition to the reactive methods of Self-Defence, incorporate proactive methods such as pre-emptive striking, and a great emphasis on awareness, evaluation, avoidance, evasion and communicative, noncombative strategies such as verbal de-escalation. An understanding of psychology thus often features prominently. As a result, self-protection systems are concerned heavily with how to stop a situation from becoming physically combative in the first place so that in a sense the physical combatives are secondary in focus. However, these physical combatives will often take up a large portion of the training time in sessions. These systems are also not concerned with aesthetics, historical traditions, cultural customs or philosophy.

So why does it matter? It matters because any confusion between these terms can lead to extreme differences of expectation and reality in training. For example, a traditional martial arts class marketing themselves as a combat sport might not be delivering what the students who have seen their posters are looking for, if they rarely hold tournaments or are not very competitive in their training. Similarly, a combat sport class focussed on UFC-style cagefighting could accidentally mislead prospective students by marketing themselves as a martial arts class, as people seeking a martial arts class may be looking for the tradition, philosophy and artistic values that a sports-based class would simply not be concerned with. This becomes more concerning when martial arts are marketed as self-defence or self-protection, however, as confidence in a martial arts technique trained from a perspective which is concerned with aesthetics can often be extremely dangerous in a real combative situation, or even fatal.

This article is not a criticism of any system, style, art or form, but rather a comment on the terminology used to denote them, and an appreciation of the effects that the confusion of these terms can have. Remember though: don’t judge a class necessarily by what it categorises itself as, because at the moment there is almost an interchangeability in many of these terms. Now that these terms have been clarified however, at least if nothing more our ESP-related discourse will be clear and unambiguous.

PHDefence (17.12.2011) Feedback and Change Announcement

imageOk, after today’s stuff, I have some notes for everyone, but especially for G.C!

Condition White: Switched off. Asleep. Victim.
Condition Yellow: Switched on. Threat awareness. Looking around.
Condition Orange: Threat evaluation – passively avoiding a potential threat (e.g. crossing the street or turning back).
Condition Red: Threat avoidance / threat neutralisation. Acting – either running off or smashing someone. Or using verbal skills. Direct action to an imminent threat.

G.C. – if you can remember those then you can keep your super-dee-duper Christmas present!

It was awesome to have Charlie and Chris back again, so welcome back to them!

Now for an announcement.

PHDefence is moving its training time!

Sessions will, from the 6th of January 2012, be taking place on Friday nights, from 19:00-21:00. The price will remain unchanged, and it’s still in the same place. Full details, as always, are on our classes page.

There is a chance that, if there is enough interest, then PHDefence will be doubling their weekly training time, providing a weekly session on Fridays at 19:00-21:00, and another on Saturdays at 10:00-12:00. This is entirely down to how many students they can get though, so either send me an email, call me, Facebook me, Tweet me, whatever you want to do – let me know. If there’s a definite three or four people interested, then Paul’s willing to keep the Saturday one open and you can all have two classes a week. It depends entirely on how many students he can get.

Don’t forget to spread the word! They need more students to make any of this possible!

PHDefence is closed for Christmas and the New Year, and will resume on Friday, the 6th of January, 2012, at 19:00-21:00. That will be the new time, and hopefully they’ll be able to keep the Saturday as well. If you don’t get in touch though, it’s not going to happen.

Merry Christmas from PHDefence and me, and we hope you have an awesome New Year too.

All the best,
FCIns. Josh Nixon

Image courtesy of http://www.clipartheaven.com/clipart/holidays/christmas/santa_&_reindeer/santa_-_martial_arts.gif

PHDefence (26.11.2011) Feedback

imageAnother awesome session at PHDefence today – Paul did some work standing up, and I did some work lying down. All in all, it was great fun and even better training! There’s talk still of PHDefence moving to Friday nights, which is looking increasingly certain as the only viable option they have, so get in touch with Paul or me to let us know what you think. I don’t think he’s planning to change anything before 2012 though.

PHDefence is cancelled next week because nobody can make it, which is a real shame, but it’s back on the week after so it’s not on Saturday the 3rd, and it is on Saturday the 10th. Bring your friends, family and random people you meet! PHDEFENCE NEEDS MORE STUDENTS!

Homework:

Yes, you’ve got homework! I’m going to see who of you reads these updates with this as well which will be funny. You have the following things to do for the next session:
- Everyone needs to have a try at the first Wing Chun Form (Xĭu Līm Tào – 小念头) for next time. Blue sashes have no excuse – you need to have more than a try because you’ll need it for your next grading! Anyone who can remember the name gets bonus awesome points. Now for some individual things:
- S.S: You need to, assuming your back’s ok, show me one full pushup. Just one.
- G.C: You need to show me some real aggression on the pads. You did it before, so I know you can do it again. Stop being so nice!
- B.S. and L. (sorry, I don’t know your second name so I can’t properly initial you but you know who you are!) have the same objective – stop being so easily distractible! You need to learn to focus. Be warned – next time you two lose focus I have an exercise for you that will help! You won’t like it much though, so this is your warning!

Sorry for the initials but I don’t feel right putting your names on properly with you being kids.

If anyone needs a copy of the guides or has any questions, get in touch.

If anyone wants some training in the meantime, or at any other time, don’t forget where I am! If there’s something you just don’t get, or you just want to make up for lost time, or you just want more training, then let me know and I’ll do whatever I can for any of you. Chuck me an email.

Now here’s the real test to see who’s been reading. Next time, I’m going to ask for the secret code, which is: ‘WEIRD BEARD’ – anyone who can’t tell me this code will have extra warmup! [insert evil laugh here]

Until next time,
FCIns. Josh Nixon

Image courtesy of http://johnandjazz.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/yip-man-and-bruce-lee.jpg

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