10 Questions with Dan Holloway (themartialview.com, Eiryukan Aikido and Function First)

1) Tell us a bit about yourself and your martial arts journey – how did it start?

I first started martial arts when I was 6 years old with Karate in the local church hall. I think I started as my parents wanted me to improve confidence and gain fitness, flexibility etc. I did Karate for a couple of years but then to be honest got a bit bored with it. I wanted to continue martial arts and so found an advertisement for Aikido at a local RAF base. That’s when I started and continue to teach and practice Aikido today. I’ve also done various other arts for varying degrees of time. I did MMA at Hull University for a few years under Louis Chapman as well as Jiu-Jitsu and Boxing. When I left university I spent some time in Australia training Aikido full time with Sensei Joe Thambu who is internationally recognised for his Aikido and self-defence skills. I then joined Matt Frost at Function First Lincoln and started to learn KFM, and now his new Renegade Street Tactics programme that he has just introduced after a few years of development. I feel really fortunate to have found martial arts so early and to have trained under such great people like Joe Thambu, Matt Frost, Robert Mustard and Justo Dieguez.

 

2) In our conversations we’ve mentioned the role of ‘traditional’ martial arts today as an area of particular interest. What role do they have for you personally, and for society in general today in your opinion?

I’ve actually written an article on this for my blog www.themartialview.com. It’s a complicated subject with lots of different elements to it.

You can firstly look at combat effectiveness and that’s what the early UFCs wanted to look at. Which art was the best when it came to a no holds barred kind of fight? Having trained primarily in Aikido for a number of years a constant criticism I hear for this art is that the techniques are unrealistic and reliant on the compliance of your partner. It’s true that when we first learn Aikido we work together to get the technique down, but what people sometimes don’t grasp is that the techniques are sometimes irrelevant and merely a way to understand the main principles of that art. All martial arts regardless of style work on the principles of unbalancing your opponent while keeping your own balance, neutralising the attack, and then employing power through the hips and lower body. Therefore I think all martial arts have their own element of combat effectiveness and teach the same principles, even if there is a slightly different slant. It’s dependent on the individual learning the art to keep realistic examples in mind, as well as the instructor to show how the art can be used for self-protection.

Self-protection or combat effectiveness is just one element to the martial arts though and I think that the development, fitness, self-discipline and respect that you learn are more important. Especially for children. As I’ve already said, I think the martial arts have shaped who I am today enormously and hope to continue training for the rest of my life. If martial arts were compulsory in schools and taught from an early age I think that society and people would have a lot more respect and discipline towards each other than it does at the moment! That’s just my opinion but I think the martial arts can offer an enormous amount of benefit to society today both in terms of practical self-protection, but more importantly, just improving you as a human being. The full article can be found here: http://www.themartialview.com/the-role-of-traditional-martial-arts-today/

 

3) How does self-protection fit into what you do?

Self-protection is just one element of Aikido as I’ve already discussed and it’s one that I personally like to focus on as it’s something that I enjoy and want to learn as much as I can about. Aikido is traditionally seen as a soft martial art but I again think that depends on the style and instructor teaching. I like to add realistic elements into my training and teaching, and think it’s an important aspect to Aikido that is sometimes overlooked. It’s known as the art of peace and that’s fantastic with the way it can improve people’s lives and a really important element, but I always remember that it is a martial art and needs to be treated as such. Some Aikido out there looks fake and put on to me and this just damages the reputation of those who want to learn effective Aikido; lowering the reputation of martial arts in general. Recently I’ve had the opportunity to train at Function First Lincoln, which (as is in the name) puts the function first. The head coach, Matt Frost, has led an incredible life and gained some real insight into real world violence and self-protection and so in terms of effective self-protection I don’t think you can get a whole lot better than him. You can read all about him and his experiences again in my 3-part interview on my blog.

 

4) What motivates you in your training? How do you get yourself going when you’re not in the mood or you have other things to do?

To be honest with you, I’m normally in the mood to train as it’s just something I’ve done for so long it comes naturally to me. When I was training in Australia I was training 6 days a week, for sometimes 7-8 hours a day in 40 degree heat. That was tough and there were a lot of times when I didn’t want to train. When that happened I remembered I was here to learn from the best and needed to make the most of my time there and so tried to improve one thing per lesson, no matter how big or small. That kept me focussed and gave me a realistic goal I could achieve after every lesson.

 

5) What would you say is the most important skill or attribute for a teacher?

I think patience and being able to communicate effectively are two majorly important aspects. You need to be patient and understand that people have different learning styles, or learn at different paces and the content needs to be fun and personal enough to ring true with people. I think the use of humour is really important as well as it can just make people feel at ease and be more receptive to the knowledge you are trying to pass along. Safe International recently wrote a great article about the use of humour in their self-protection courses which can be found here: http://safeinternational.biz/blog/2014/03/12/humour-is-the-missing-link-in-most-self-defense-courses-2/

 

6) What would you say is the most important aspect of your training, skill you develop or attribute you cultivate in your training and teaching?

In terms of learning from Matt at Function First Lincoln I’m still just a beginner and so am taking in everything I can to do with Renegade Street Tactics and thinking how it applies to what I’ve already studied before as for me there is quite a lot of crossover. In terms of my Aikido I’m trying to increase the speed and fluidity of my techniques so they become more effective and rapid.

 

7) What do you like to do aside from training and teaching? What interests you?

Music and martial arts are big parts of my life. I’ve played the guitar and piano for a number of years and think it takes that same discipline to learn an instrument as a martial art. The hours you have to spend trying to nail the chord progression or riff to a song is the same hours you spend trying to nail the technique and so to me again there’s a great crossover with both!

 

8) What advice do you have for students out there reading this?

Enjoy your training! If you’re really into it you will be for the long run as in my experience, once someone gets the bug for martial arts, they have it for a very long time. Everyone has days where they feel like they don’t want to train but I’d encourage people to go anyway and once they’re there they’ll enjoy themselves. I’d also encourage people to learn from everyone and train in everything they can. Traditional guys can learn stuff from other styles and real self-defence such as Keysi by Justo, Defence Lab or Renegade Street Tactics and vice versa! Learn from everyone, train with everyone and try everything! Then, like Bruce Lee said, take what’s useful and discard what isn’t!

 

9) What advice do you have for instructors out there reading this?

I’m not really sure I can give advice as I’m sure there are a million instructors out there better than I am with more experience. I would say don’t let your own training suffer too much as a result of teaching. Your own development may take a bit of a hit when you first start instructing as your focus then turns to the students rather than 100% you, but you always need to make the time for you personally to develop and progress, working on more advanced things or recovering the basic elements of whatever art you do.

 

10) What is your ultimate goal with training and teaching? Where do you want it to lead?

The dream would be eventually to set up my own academy which teaches both traditional martial arts as well as pure self defence and fitness. That’s a long way in the future however and so for the time being I’m learning all I can, training with everyone I can and just trying to get as much experience in the martial arts as possible!

 

You can get in touch with Dan at http://themartialview.com/, join the Martial View Facebook group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/614340578652460/ or find him on Twitter at https://twitter.com/themartialview.

PHDefence (17.12.2011) Feedback and Change Announcement

imageOk, after today’s stuff, I have some notes for everyone, but especially for G.C!

Condition White: Switched off. Asleep. Victim.
Condition Yellow: Switched on. Threat awareness. Looking around.
Condition Orange: Threat evaluation – passively avoiding a potential threat (e.g. crossing the street or turning back).
Condition Red: Threat avoidance / threat neutralisation. Acting – either running off or smashing someone. Or using verbal skills. Direct action to an imminent threat.

G.C. – if you can remember those then you can keep your super-dee-duper Christmas present!

It was awesome to have Charlie and Chris back again, so welcome back to them!

Now for an announcement.

PHDefence is moving its training time!

Sessions will, from the 6th of January 2012, be taking place on Friday nights, from 19:00-21:00. The price will remain unchanged, and it’s still in the same place. Full details, as always, are on our classes page.

There is a chance that, if there is enough interest, then PHDefence will be doubling their weekly training time, providing a weekly session on Fridays at 19:00-21:00, and another on Saturdays at 10:00-12:00. This is entirely down to how many students they can get though, so either send me an email, call me, Facebook me, Tweet me, whatever you want to do – let me know. If there’s a definite three or four people interested, then Paul’s willing to keep the Saturday one open and you can all have two classes a week. It depends entirely on how many students he can get.

Don’t forget to spread the word! They need more students to make any of this possible!

PHDefence is closed for Christmas and the New Year, and will resume on Friday, the 6th of January, 2012, at 19:00-21:00. That will be the new time, and hopefully they’ll be able to keep the Saturday as well. If you don’t get in touch though, it’s not going to happen.

Merry Christmas from PHDefence and me, and we hope you have an awesome New Year too.

All the best,
FCIns. Josh Nixon

Image courtesy of http://www.clipartheaven.com/clipart/holidays/christmas/santa_&_reindeer/santa_-_martial_arts.gif

11 Year Old Karateka Fights Off Attacker in Bristol

Jade PiddenJade Pidden, an 11-year-old Karateka from Bristol has managed to fend off an attacker she described as white, 6ft tall, slim, in his early 20s, with light brown hair and a long fringe. She said he was wearing a blue hoodie, with white writing and tight jeans with black and white Nike trainers.

The following is an excerpt from the original news story. Police are investigating the incident and are appealing for witnesses.

Brown-belt Jade says she first spotted the man when she turned off Lyons Court Road and into Winash Close.

By the time she reached the lane running between the Imperial ground field and Knowle golf course she said he was right behind her and asking to speak to her.

Jade ran away through a gap in the fence and into the field, pursued by the man who managed to grab her rucksack.

But she fought back, delivering the blows that saw her attacker run off.

"He was trying to grab me, not my bag. The bag was just something he was able to get hold of when I ran.

"When he did I just automatically responded by elbowing him in the chest and punching him in the face.

"He looked pretty shocked and ran away with his hand over one eye. I was quite upset but my sister and her friend comforted me on the rest of the way to school."

It should be noted that it’s likely the attacker has some injury to an eye, so bear this in mind while it might still be swollen if you’re in the area and see someone matching the description!

To those who can’t be bothered training in a martial art or other combative system, I urge you to think again. This isn’t about me plugging CSPS as an answer, or using scare tactics to get more students. This is me urging you all to think about your level of preparedness if something like this happened, and think about those you care about too. Would your children be able to defend themselves against an attack like this? Would they be aware enough to see it coming? Would you? If you have any doubts when thinking about these questions, get yourself to the nearest martial arts or self protection class as soon as you possibly can. Get in touch with the British Combat Association or check out their club listing for yourselves at http://britishcombat.co.uk/club-listing/ to make sure you find a reputable club who’s insured with the leading organisation in the UK. Don’t take the chance – find yourself a class you enjoy and an instructor you like, and prepare yourself!

I can’t congratulate Jade enough – she’s an example to everyone’s students. Your training’s not supposed to be left at the Dojo! Never let the scum win. Get away or fight back, but whatever you do, commit. Commit to your training and commit to your personal security. Get training!

I’ll get off my soap box now, I’ve got some training to do.

Do you think self-protection should be taught to kids in PE at school? Join the discussion at the CSPS forum: http://cspsonline.proboards.com/index.cgi?action=display&board=general&thread=93

Original article featured on the CSPS Facebook page – if you want to stay updated chuck us a like and you’ll get news like this in your Feed: http://www.facebook.com/CSPSonline

Alternatively, throw us a follow: http://twitter.com/CSPSonline

Or just subscribe over in the sidebar to the right! —–>

Image courtesy of the original article at http://www.thisisbristol.co.uk/Karate-girl-11-fights-attacker-Bristol/story-13579700-detail/story.html

Update: March 2011

Hey all,

First off, let me send out a huge thank you to everyone who’s been showing interest in CSPS over this start-up period. We’ve been having steady views here at CSPS Online, and have been pleased with all of the questions we’ve been receiving. By all means keep them coming! To address some of the more repetitive questions, I’ve just updated the FAQ section to accommodate the ones we keep getting again and again, so if I refer you to that section I’m not being rude and ignoring you; I just don’t have the time to type out the same answer over and over again. Also thanks to everyone who’s following us on Twitter, our likers on Facebook and our subscribers on YouTube too. We really appreciate all of the support and interest.

Thanks to the select few (and you know who you are, my friends) who’ve been contributing to the redrafting process of the Syllabus and Guide, many hours of discussion and training later we’ve finally published version 1.0; the final draft and the first official release version! There has also been a general redraft of some of this site’s information as a result, because a lot of the information is also found in the introductory pages of the booklet.

Syllabi will be available in class for just £1 – I’m really sorry to have to charge, but it’s literally just to cover the printing costs. It’s a 23-page concise booklet, so I’m not ripping you off with it; you’re getting a meaty wad of paper for your quid. It’ll be invaluable in your training to have a copy of everything you’ll need to hand, but while it’s recommended it is of course optional, and you can share with a friend or anything. You’re also not obliged to buy a new copy with each update; we’ll tell you what the changes are if and when updates happen (CSPS evolves, as you all know) and you can annotate your copies instead of buying a whole new book.

The Syllabus also now explains our revolutionary, unique ‘CSPS Ranges Notation System’, which I created myself, in the Beginners’ section, just so you have a reference for that as well as everything else. If anyone has any suggestions, criticism or spots and mistakes (even niggly English mistakes – they’re important to us!) then just chuck us an email at csps.info@gmail.com.

See you all in May at the launch of CSPS Endon – full details on the Classes page.

Thanks again,
FCIns. Josh Nixon

A Quick Update

Hey all,

Just thought I’d push around a quick update on our progress in these early days, if nothing else to reassure you all that we are actually doing something! At the moment we’re just waiting for final confirmation from our venue. The application process has been started with the BCA so we’re just waiting for that to continue really.

The Syllabus and Guide has been updated a little, and final beta versions have been issued to Sifu Paul Horrobin of PHDefence along with some of my very good friends and training partners for them to scrutinise and scribble all over. Once they’ve all got back to me I’ll properly write up version 4.0, which will be the first release candidate.

Meanwhile, I’ve been training some of the obscure stuff that I haven’t done for a while in case it comes up in class (though I’m pretty sure it won’t for a while) and making sure I’m in shape for it. I always say that as an Instructor you should try to be better, harder, stronger, faster, more accurate, more adaptable, keep going for longer and ultimately be more knowledgeable than your students. Otherwise people won’t respect your authority on the subject because, to be frank, what authority do you have over them? Practically speaking, you have to be able to show them how you want them to do something, not just describe it. Otherwise training becomes just a chat.

While I’m here, I’d just like to say thank you to everyone who’s been visiting! Just so you know, I really do appreciate your interest. If anyone has any questions, or anything you’d like me to write about in the future, or ideas for instructional videos (or other videos) that you’d like to see on our YouTube channel when we start churning out videos and things. We monitor all the comms channels, so whether you send us a message or mention us on Twitter, send us a message or comment on YouTube or email us we’ll get it.

Keep coming back for more updates, thoughts on training, etc from CSPS – soon we’ll be announcing our first class, which will be the beginning of the end for combative ignorance!

All the very best,

Josh Nixon
Founding Chief Instructor, CSPS

CSPS Online is Finally Here!

CSPS Online, meet the world. World, meet CSPS Online. I’m sure you’re going to get on wonderfully…

Hi, I’m Josh Nixon and this blog is going to be the main online face of CSPS – the Combative Self-Protection System. All the information’s living in the pages at the top, so I won’t bore you with that right now. I’m just saying hello really, and checking for any teething problems before I get going properly.

As you can see from the buttons at the top, there’s a Twitter and YouTube presence already, and I’m sure there’ll be plenty more things coming soon. I’m going to get to work on a good logo and banner image, and once some interest, classes and members spring up then we’ll probably end up with a forum too. It’s all starting here and now, and this will be the hub of all the news from the System. If you have any questions, comments, suggestions, or just want to say hello then be my guest to subscribe over to the right, follow us on Twitter, email us, subscribe on YouTube, or whatever else!

We’re based in Stoke-on-Trent, but our potential is global. There’s no knowing where we’ll end up, so keep in touch. We hope to hear from you soon!

-Josh Nixon
Founding Chief Instructor, CSPS

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