Training Notes – Endon – 20.03.2015

IMG_20150217_205603 - CopyOn our Facebook page today I made a tongue-in-cheek reference to the eclipse this morning, saying that they’re a portent of epic things to come.

I wasn’t wrong. This week’s session was phenomenal.

A warm welcome to another new member who is already experienced in Filipino martial arts, JKD, BJJ and KFM. We love it when people come who are already experienced martial artists, as they always have something new and fresh to bring to the table. By the same token, it was great to have our friendly neighbourhood Samurai with us again showing off some incredible Jujutsu skills on the ground!

This week, we’d been double-booked by our new venue. As there was an annual event going on in the hall, we were told we couldn’t train. This, of course, is not how we roll so I asked if we could use the small back room instead. The result was a very enjoyable shake-up to how we normally train!

The funny thing is, I’d planned a session focussed on close-quarters stuff!

To start, we warmed up with some partner work:

  • Pushes and strikes for relaxed movement and footwork.
  • Positioning for control: controlling a partner’s arm and following up with strikes and takedowns.
    • Recap: forwards and backwards fall absorption and efficient takedowns by manipulating the spine that we looked at last week.

Then we got onto some more in-depth partner work in close quarters:

  • Person A grabs Person B’s shirt and punches him in the face. Classic angry man outside the chippie style.
    • Person B uses positioning, footwork and parrying or blocking (depending on angle) to move IN to the attacker and gain control of their posture.
    • Person B takes Person A to the floor.
    • Progression 1: Person B then tries to kick and stamp on their partner, who climbs up them (as we did the other week) in order to prevent this rather unpleasant treatment and maintain control in the process.
    • Progression 2: Person A takes Person B down. Person B climbs up Person A and takes him down. Continuous with quick changes of partners at unexpected moments!

Of course, as always we respect the reiterate the Force Continuum: we’re using the stamping and kicking here as a tool to explore how to deal with that kind of assault, not necessarily as a recommended followup once you’ve taken an attacker down!

Padwork in close quarters (ranges 2 and 3):

  • Hook punches, palm strikes and hammer fists starting with the striking hand on one pad, enforcing a short distance within which you can accelerate.
    • Relaxed movement and footwork to generate power.
  • Short elbow strikes from a reference point:
    • From the fence, front hand is the reference point.
    • Collapse the arm and step forward quickly, striking with the elbow.
  • Proactive targeting: Don’t just wait for a target to present itself! Make your own opportunities. Grab the pad and move it to where you want it. Grab the head and turn the face away, etc.

Don’t be reactive. Be proactive.

Edged weapons:

  • A common modus operandi for stabbings: grab and stab (linked to the previous grab and punch).
  • Using this as a framework (lead hand grab, frenzied stabbing with the rear hand towards anywhere in the torso), we explored how to increase our chances of surviving.
    • Drill 1: knife acclimatisation. 
      • Moving parts of the body away from the blade in order to limit the chance and seriousness of injury.
      • Awareness of which parts of the body to be particularly wary of protecting.
      • Awareness of where the knife is and what it’s doing.
    • Drill 2: grab and stab, grip and control development.
      • Person A grabs Person B as before and stabs towards the stomach with their rear hand.
      • Person B responds the moment he’s grabbed – immediately – and moves his torso away while intercepting the other arm. It could be a stab or a punch, or he could be reaching for a gun, or anything – right now, it doesn’t matter. Intercept that arm.
      • The stab comes, but is parried by that intercepting arm. Person B grabs onto the attacking arm and controls it close to their chest using both hands. The knife is pointing away from them and the arm is secure.
        •  …or is it? Person A tests the grip by violently shaking their arm and trying to free it. Maximum force, absolute ferocity.
          •  With a high COM (Centre of Mass), you can be moved around easily. The further you are from their shoulder, the easier you are to ‘rag around’ and take off-balance. It takes great footwork to keep up with this. Drop your COM a little with a slight bend in your knees (keep good posture though) and sink yourself in close to the attacker’s shoulder and you can resist their efforts much more efficiently.
            • Today’s (O_o) face goes to Dave for full-on picking me up in the air in the process of demonstrating this!
        • If you don’t get stabbed and cut up, you secured the arm. If not, you didn’t!
    • Drill 3: grab and stab, followup from control.
      • Once we established how to achieve and maintain control with a non-compliant partner ragging you around, we looked at what to do from there.
        • Striking options: quickly striking when opportunities are present and returning to controlling the weapon.
          • Striking without letting go: using the shoulders, head and feet to strike while keeping full control of the armed arm (pun intended).
        • Takedowns: risky but potentially viable. Take their balance by manipulating the spine.
        • Disarming: keep it simple and stupid. Smash their arm until they let go, or keep two-handed control of the arm and smash the back of the hand into a wall if there’s one there.
          • If you end up on the floor, smash the hand into the floor. You can also pin the arm using your leg while you do what you need to.
      • Again, the Force Continuum has to be reiterated. Don’t just default to grabbing the knife and carving your name into their chest! If you can avoid using excessive levels of force, and this is entirely dependent on the situation and all its infinite variables, then you should.
    • Drill 4: exploring parrying and striking simultaneously.
      • Person A stabs Person B as before, but wears a focus mitt so Person B can strike while simultaneously dealing with the blade and going for the control, etc. A useful little drill.

To finish, we did some basic breathwork drills (which we’ll return to next week…) and tension & relaxation work, along with percussive massage.

This week’s session was incredible. An awesome turnout, another new member and the return of recent new members as well as our seasoned warriors. The atmosphere was fantastic, the skill and effort I saw in everyone was unbelievable, and it was incredibly enjoyable to train with you all as it always is.

See you next week! We’re back in the usual hall from next week onwards, though that room is always there if we want it…

-Josh Nixon

All the details of this class are on the Public Classes page up at the top. Your first session is FREE and all are welcome to come along and take part. Every session is beginner-friendly.

Training Notes – Endon – 06.03.2015

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This week’s session was our first to be held at Endon Village Hall now that we’ve moved there from our old venue in Stockton Brook. We’ll all miss the old place – it was the focal point of the local community in many ways, and many of us have trained there for years – but we were all looking forward to training in Endon.

The new venue is excellent: a bigger hall, convenient location and overall a really great place to train.

As always, it was a pleasure to see you all again and the quality of the training was truly excellent. The skill, progress and raw natural ability I see every week is truly incredible. Very well done to everyone. Awesome effort and fantastic atmosphere.

Last week, we worked on ‘the fence’ and used it as a framework to explore footwork, positioning and posture, as well as distance management, communicative strategies, striking and surviving an armed assault.

This week, we progressed from the basic skills we looked at last time and used them in some interesting and effective ways.

  • Warmup and exercise: most of this week’s exercise was focussed on quadrupedal movement – various methods of crawling, etc on the floor – and using those movements as incredibly useful (and fun!) exercises. We looked at Kong bounds and sideways Chimpanzee crawls in particular, as well as some rolling.
  • Fence – but what then?
    • That was the focus this time: once we’ve managed the distance, what then?
    • We looked at two basic skills and two ways in which they can be used:
      • Parrying: redirecting a movement without directly opposing its force.
        • Using our hands and forearms to parry straight punches to the face.
      • Blocking: directly opposing a movement forcefully, preventing it from continuing.
        • Using our forearms and elbows to block hook punches, slaps, etc to the side of the head.
        • Finding beneficial targets and ‘attacking the attack’: stepping into the movement, intercepting it and applying an elbow to the pectoral (or shoulder) and a forearm to the bicep.
    • Economy of motion: using the fence as a starting point, the hands don’t have to move very far in order to successfully intercept an attack.
  • We looked at using the drop-step as a short, explosive movement that is useful both in intercepting an attack and in getting more mass behind a strike.
    • We also looked at pre-emptive striking (and the legality of it) and discussed some issues of the force continuum that must be considered.
  • Striking with the Knuckles:
    • Jab (your lead hand), cross (your rear hand) and hook punches.
    • Power generation:
      • The drop step
      • The preceding drop step (elastic recoil)
      • Rotational movements (incorporating elastic recoil)
      • Maintaining relaxation and mobility in the shoulders while striking
    • A progressive intensity striking drill to ensure straight, strong wrists.
  • Padwork with a ‘live’ partner:
    • Person A does pushups while Person B (wearing focus mitts) inconveniences them!
      • Distracting and annoying slaps, kicks, added resistance by pressing on Person A’s back, etc.
    • On command, Person A aggressively climbs their way up Person B while Person B tries to tread on them and kick them! This is more fun and less dangerous than it sounds, trust me…
    • Person A, standing, maintains control of Person B and moves Person B into position and strikes the pads that Person B presents at random timings and angles.
    • The pushups resume, and the drill continues…
    • This is a very enjoyable and yet exhausting drill where we accomplish a lot of things: we get very tired very quickly and do so in a situation of resistance: our partner is trying to make it difficult for us emotionally as well as physically so we learn to keep our focus on what we’re doing and avoid distractions. We learn how to get up from the floor in a dangerous situation safely and efficiently, we learn how to maintain control of an aggressive partner and we practice our striking too. We learn how to go from doing something else (in a position of disadvantage – lying down on the floor) to quickly and decisively acting on a stimulus beyond our control: the instructor shouting ‘GO!’ and our partner suddenly trying to tread on us and kick us while we get up.
  • We also looked at some of the methods employed last week and the week before against an assault with a stick, and finished off with some percussive massage – Russian style. More than just being very relaxing and beneficial for stretching out and loosening off any tension we’ve built up in training, we learn a lot about striking someone and dealing with incoming strikes too, as well as breathwork and awareness of tension and relaxation. Very useful work.

Many thanks to all who came, it was a pleasure as always, and see you all next time!

-Josh Nixon

All the details of this class are on the Public Classes page up at the top. Your first session is FREE and all are welcome to come along and take part. Every session is beginner-friendly.

Training Notes – 13.02.2015

IMG_20150214_121842A quiet week this week but a good session nonetheless! A warm welcome to our newest member who did exceptionally well with the hammer fist striking we worked on! Very natural movement and stable posture all round.

  • Taking a simple exercise and making it horrible: shifting weight forwards, backwards or sideways to change the emphasis with our pushups, and holding exercises such as pushups and squats isometrically.
  • Striking we looked at: palm strikes, hammer fists and turning elbow strikes. To recap:
    • Palm strikes are relatively low-risk strikes that are easy to employ. They can generate lots of power and hit lots of nerve endings all at once, so can be quite disorienting and shocking. You can also grab on straight away once you’ve hit. They’re quick too.
    • Hammer fists are powerful and also relatively quite low-risk to the striker.
    • Elbow strikes are devastating, quite easy to employ and are very useful when close up.
  • Impact development: feeling the weight of your arm and relaxed striking movements.
  • Dealing with impact and pushes: relaxed movement, joint mobility and footwork. Angles and directions.
  • Working against armed assaults: a simple drill against a stick being swung at your head and a similar concept being applied against a very common knife attack situation: grabbing the shirt and stabbing towards the stomach with the rear hand.
    • Gaining control of the armed arm (haha) and testing how much control we have.
    • Finding opportunities to strike and get away.
    • Taking the stick and striking with it if we need to (see: Force Continuum).
  • Breathwork drill for awareness of tension and relaxation.

All of this came together into a nice training session with a clear objective in mind when dealing with the attacks we looked at: to escape (safely). We had a new student this week who took on the concepts we explored quickly and easily with very nice, natural movement. Many thanks also to Chris for providing such exemplary (devastating) striking to discuss!

I hope you all have an awesome weekend and thanks for coming. See you next week!

Details of this class can be found here.

Josh

Training Notes – 06.02.2015

I had, as ever, an incredible time training with you all on Friday! Hope you’re all having an awesome weekend. Here’s this week’s notes on the training we did.

  • Anything can become a training tool – even balloons! Training game 1 was team keepy-uppy with balloons. More and more of them! Every time one touches the ground, pushups for all!
    • (Any drill or training game can be intensified. Be creative!)
  • The key with exercise and warmups is to ENJOY them – training game 2 was fencing with rubber sticks, while I annoyed everyone with various rules applied to the spar:
    • Left hand only,
    • You must use both hands (interesting to see how people interpret this),
    • You have to be sitting on the floor,
    • You have to keep at least half your stomach on the floor,
    • You have to lie on your back, etc
  • Taking two ideas and merging them together works very well too, and isometric tension exercises work well with ground mobility. Thus, training game 3 was plank & roll leapfrog! Persons A and B perform a plank parallel to each other, and then on command person A rolls over person B (who is still planking) and assumes a plank where he ends up, again parallel. Then on the next command person B does the same, and we go up and down the hall like that! A great tension and relaxation drill.
  • Biomechanics and footwork: getting our body weight into palm strikes and hook punches.
  • Feeling for tension and relaxation in striking: elastic recoil.
  • Relaxed movement: dealing with getting hit and getting out of the way in the first place.
    • On the attack: ‘swimming through’ the attacker.
  • Targeting and position: striking straight, up and down to good targets.
  • Knife on knife: an unlikely situation that you happen to have a knife when attacked with one, but a useful one to look at from time to time. Lots of useful concepts: disable the attacking limb, don’t go overboard if you don’t need to, maintaining contact, etc.
  • Conditioning of the knuckles and wrist for striking: gorilla crawl (knuckle version) and progressive striking drills.
  • Loosening off: a nice flow from sitting.

See you next week! All the details of this class are here.

-Josh

Free Open Snow Day Training Workshop! (Friday, 30th January, 2015)

Due to the chaos caused by a bit of snow last night, we’ve decided to do things a little differently and have ourselves an Open Snow Day Training Workshop!

Anyone and everyone is welcome to drop in any time between 17:00 and 19:00 today, and anyone who does brave the blizzards and storm the snowdrifts to get to us can have a cuppa on us too.

If it’s your first time training with us, you’re welcome to come and have your first session for free!

We’ll be covering a variety of topics, including:

  • threat awareness
  • threat evaluation
  • threat avoidance
  • management of (and awareness of) personal space and positioning
  • preparations for taking action
  • upper-body and lower-body striking
  • power generation and impact management
  • ground mobility
  • escapes
  • parrying, jamming and blocking
  • throws, takedowns and breaking posture
  • problem-solving in combative situations
  • dealing with armed assault: surviving attacks with blunt and edged weapons

We train at The Wesley Methodist Church hall, Leek New Road, Stockton Brook, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, ST9 9NX and usually our training session is 17:45-18:45 every Friday.

All welcome as are your questions! Don’t forget – this is all free if it’s your first time so feel free to drop in, have a cuppa and learn something about what we do.

You can reach me at 01782502684 (landline) or 07981175878 (mobile but I’ll have negligible signal until about 16:00 or so), or on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/EvolutionarySelfProtection .

I made an event on Facebook for it: http://www.facebook.com/events/1531366307150866
And one on Streetlife! http://www.streetlife.com/conversation/d95jspv6e2el/

See you later!

-Josh Nixon

Review: ‘Ultimate Self-Defence Seminar’ by Peter Consterdine and Geoff Thompson

Consterdine, Peter and Thompson, Geoff. Ultimate Self-Defence Seminar. Protection Publications. 2005.

Review: Ultimate Self-Defence Seminar:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

This video is one of those well-known ones, considered essential by many, that you often hear about as an instructor. There’s good reason for that.

‘Action beats reaction’ – this is the key understanding that makes Geoff and Peter’s approach so much better than most when it comes to self-protection. Peter makes this point with a little demonstration of blocking’s uselessness in a reactive manner after a simple warmup of exercises chiefly concerned with coordination. He goes on to give what I consider the best explanation of the double-hip method of striking I’ve ever seen. There’s similarities between this and Systema’s waveform striking, which is definitely worth looking into as well if you like this method of power generation. I definitely do. It works very nicely for me, especially for body shots.

Following from this, Peter goes on to discuss and demonstrate sections on: speed and the flinch response, pre-emptive striking, UK self-defence law, adrenaline and the physiological biochemical responses of stress, pre-planning for violence, the effects of mind-altering chemicals, effective punchbag training, dialogue training, palm striking, the issues around striking with the knuckles to the face, lining up an aggressor, the biomechanics of efficient striking, zanshin, footwork, distance’s effect on striking opportunities, and the effects of surprise and shock on striking efficacy.

‘There’s no growth in comfort.’ I’ve got that up in the garage with my punchbag. For the second half, Geoff Thompson takes over and begins with hook punching on the pads, then a drill of striking with restricted movement. Afterwards, Geoff goes on to discuss and demonstrate sections on: fear and discomfort, double-hip striking towards the face, verbal distraction and deception with pre-emptive striking, usage of ‘the fence’ and shows of aggression, dynamic biomechanics in kicking (with Peter Consterdine), bodyweight grappling drills, foot tripping and trapping drills, striking from positions of biomechanical disadvantage, throwing and groundfighting, the importance of reading and learning, and attitudinal changes that are beneficial to training and to combat.

This really is a gem of a video. I personally find it quite motivational to listen to aside from the training ideas it offers. I highly recommend this one in particular as a worthy addition to any instructor’s shelf. Moreover, I would recommend this to students and prospective students too – if your instructor or prospective instructor doesn’t discuss any the kinds of things shown in this video (or especially if they’re ignorant of the concepts) then chances are they’re not worth your time. That’s a strong thing to say, I realise, but I feel that the quality of the basic information and sentiment behind this video’s content is substantial enough to warrant such a statement. The bottom line: watch this.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found at http://peterconsterdine.com/ultimatesd.htm.

Review: ‘Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Seminar’ by Peter Consterdine

Consterdine, Peter. Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Seminar. Protection Publications. 2007.

Review: Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Seminar:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

No messing around, this video starts as it means to go on with some impact development on the pads. As is usual with a British Combat Association production, a very important point is raised early on; that we shouldn’t be hesitant (and thus inefficient) when attacking. Instead, we should make sure that everything we do ‘explodes’; that it’s fast, committed and decisive.

The video goes on to cover stance length and the issues around it, relaxation for impact development in kicking, footwork and biomechanics in kicking, concomitancy when kicking alongside upper-body striking, exposure time and timing in striking, kicking at close ranges, Wing Chun (詠春 ~ yǒng chūn) tactile sensitivity drills (Sticking Hands ~ 黐手 ~ chī shǒu), parrying and blocking drills, recovery and commitment in kicking, intensity, adrenaline, stress, context and setting.

The DVD is unique in that this is the first full seminar Peter has given which covers his own high level martial arts training. Renowned for the “double hip” generating power of his strikes and kicks, this seminar, covered how power is generated and explosive speed with maximum dynamic movement and aggression. All this is shown as well as the key elements in the ultra-fast transitions from punching to kicking and vice versa.

(Information from http://peterconsterdine.com/pctraining.htm on 28.02.2013)

This video, in summary, demonstrates a group of men and women taking part in some excellent martial arts training. What sets it aside from other such videos is that it’s done with intensity. My advice to anyone who feels their training is missing something in terms of intensity is to watch this and take on the general feeling of motivation. Essentially, as Peter says at the end, this training session only has a few basic things in it: jabs, crosses, hooks, uppercuts and roundhouse kicks more or less. However, the crucial understanding is how they train these basic things at the British Combat Association.

Assistant Instructors who took part in this seminar include Steve Williams, Iain Abernethy, John Skillen and Peter Lakin.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found at http://peterconsterdine.com/pctraining.htm.

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