Review: ‘Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Volume 2’ by Peter Consterdine

Consterdine, Peter. Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Volume 2. Protection Publications. 2005.

Review: Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Volume 2:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

Last week we looked at the excellent first part to this two-part series, which can be found here.

The Training Day videos follow on from the enquiries made after the popular Fit to Fight videos became well-known (part one reviewed here and part 2 reviewed here). As you may expect from a BCA video, this one is excellent. It’s fitness-oriented but is packed full of drills that are very combatively useful. The key point of the approach presented here to training is in developing functional fitness by doing cardio, etc that is at the same time developing combatively useful attributes.

The video begins with an important discussion from Peter about concomitancy or flow when putting movements together – ‘getting the transitions right’ – which is a key understanding for those interested in this kind of training. Training in this kind of high intensity and focussing on a small amount of methods is a great way to work on endurance and stamina while also improving the quality of the movement itself.

The video includes a number of additional drills following from the approach laid out in the first part of this pair, including pressure work and padwork with the focus mitts in threes as well as in pairs, punching and kicking drills, the ‘four-corner blitz’, ducking and weaving drills, shuttle drills, combination drills, repetition drills and pyramid drills.

Interspersed between these drills being demonstrated is Peter explaining key understandings for each section.

There’s also an attempt at the end from Brian Seabright to get 60 roundhouse kicks into a minute!

This video demonstrates, again, a group of highly skilled martial artists at work generating some impressive impact and, of course, making it look easy! I definitely recommend using these training methods yourself.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found at http://www.peterconsterdine.com/trainingday2.htm.

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Review: ‘Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Volume 1’ by Peter Consterdine

Consterdine, Peter. Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Volume 1. Protection Publications. 2004.

Review: Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Volume 1:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

This review is part one of a two-part series. Part two is can be found here.

The Training Day videos follow on from the enquiries made after the popular Fit to Fight videos became well-known (part one reviewed here and part 2 reviewed here). As you may expect from a BCA video, this one is excellent. It’s fitness-oriented but is packed full of drills that are very combatively useful. The key point of the approach presented here to training is in developing functional fitness by doing cardio, etc that is at the same time developing combatively useful attributes.

There’s a lot of ideas in here for incorporating bag work, pad work, shuttle drills, partner drills, pressure work,  traditional Karate padwork drills with a fitness focus, ‘slow-mo’ sparring, pyramid drills and shield kicking drills.

As well as just the drills, this video shows a group of absolutely phenomenal punchers and kickers at work. There’s some fantastic impact generated by these martial artists; very high levels of skill demonstrated indeed. Martial artists in this video include (of course) Peter Consterdine, Brian Seabright, Bernard Taylor, Steve Williams and Richard Hardy.

I definitely recommend taking a look at this training session and using it yourself as a basis for yours. It really is excellent.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found athttp://www.peterconsterdine.com/trainingday1.htm.

Review: ‘Fit to Fight Part 2’ by Peter Consterdine

Consterdine, Peter. Fit to Fight Part 2. Protection Publications. 2000.

Review: Fit to Fight Part 2:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

This video follows on from the popular fourth video in the ‘Pavement Arena’ series, entitled ‘Fit to Fight’, which is reviewed here.

This video builds on the previous points raised in Fit to Fight but takes a different route through the subject matter. It caters more for those without the luxury of gym equipment and experienced partners, and thus deals with solo training and bodyweight exercises a lot more. Minimal equipment is required for most of the exercises in this video. There’s some good fitness-oriented bag work in this video which can add a lot to your fitness routine.

In the second half there’s a section for those who can find some training partners of similar levels of fitness or experience. The exercises and drills in this (particularly the bag work, focus mitts and shield drills) are fantastic for sharpening your skills, especially for martial artists. The concepts used can easily be applied to any kind of training, whether you’re coming at this from a martial arts perspective or one from a combative sport, from self-defence or self-protection. In short, there’s not very much to say for this video other than it’s extremely useful for anyone interested in getting serious with their fitness.

Watch this. Do the drills. You won’t regret it.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found at http://www.peterconsterdine.com/fit-to-fight.htm.

Review: ‘The Pavement Arena Part 4’ by Peter Consterdine and Geoff Thompson

Consterdine, Peter and Thompson, Geoff. The Pavement Arena Part Four: ‘Fit to Fight’. Legend Video Productions. 1994.

Review: The Pavement Arena Part 4: ‘Fit to Fight’:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

This article is part of a series. Part one can be found here, part two can be found here, part three can be found here, this is part four and part five (sort of – it follows on from this video but isn’t part of the Pavement Arena series) can be found here.

Part four of the Pavement Arena series focuses on how to cultivate the mental and physical attributes required to train efficiently and be more likely to survive a violent encounter. While the physical benefits of fitness training are transient, the mental benefits are the focus of this video’s approach. The desire not to be victimised and the will to ensure that this does not occur can be bolstered with the psychological elements of perseverance and determination that can be gained from fitness training.

The video goes through resistance training for a good balance of muscle endurance and strength, with a lot of advice on using machines and weights for resistance training. There’s also some information on cardiovascular training and elements of HIIT in particular, which is recommended for any respectable fitness training routine. Later, there’s some exercise that doesn’t require gym equipment (some requiring partners and some which don’t) which is fantastic for general fitness as well as for combative training.

There are some exercises that are combatively focussed, but anyone can do them and you don’t have to be a martial artist or a self-protectionist to do them or to benefit greatly from them. The running and kicking drills in particular are great for flexibility and explosive power, as well as being good cardio. There’s groundwork in here and bag work too which adds a lot to this training’s usefulness for anyone doing a martial art, combat sport, self-defence or self-protection. At the end there’s a section on training outside with and without partners which, again, is full of excellent ideas.

All in all, I would recommend this as essential knowledge for fitness training in general, and definitely for anyone who is also combatively interested. If you’re new to fitness training or how to factor it into your existing combative training, this is definitely for you.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found at http://www.peterconsterdine.com/arena4.htm.

Review: ‘The Pavement Arena Part 3’ by Peter Consterdine and Geoff Thompson

Consterdine, Peter and Thompson, Geoff. The Pavement Arena Part Three: ‘Grappling – The Last Resort’. Legend Video Productions. 1994.

Review: The Pavement Arena Part 3: ‘Grappling – The Last Resort’:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

This review is part of a series. Part one can be found here, part two can be found here, this is part three, part four can be found here and part five (sort of – it follows on from part four but isn’t part of the Pavement Arena series) can be found here.

This third instalment in the popular ‘Pavement Arena’ series is, again, often eye-opening to its viewers. Many do not consider grappling in enough depth for its real combative applications, and many court it too much which can lead to problems of its own. With grappling in particular, a balance must be struck between training it enough to be competent and thus to (hopefully) survive the horrible situation of finding yourself grappling with an assailant, and training it to the exclusion of other things, such as punching. In addition, we must be very careful with how we train grappling, as it can be easy to fall into a sporting paradigm when learning grappling from arts such as Judo. While Judo is excellent and is one of the activities I personally intend to enjoy much more in the near future (as I feel I can learn a lot from it, it will be very enjoyable and will be great for my fitness and strength), we must remember that it is a sport and that certain aspects of sports-based training must be kept strictly separate from self-protection training, just as the premise of this series is that traditional martial arts training and self-protection training are not the same and thus the differences must be appreciated for self-protection training to be efficient.

This video begins with this essential discussion of the realities of grappling in real combative situations, which (as with the others of the series) sets the tone immediately of a solid and well-thought-out presentation. There are some ground mobility drills involving breakfalls near the beginning which, of course, are only to be used on mats. Rolling can work fine on a hard surface, but slapping breakfalls are good only for soft, level surfaces. Never attempt on a hard or uneven surface! They’re essential in grappling training on a matted surface though, in order for partners to fall more realistically for each other without injury and thus to allow the necessary full-force, realistic throwing. The required safety aspects of training in grappling are emphasised in the video, such as the Tap-Out safety system and the necessity of having an onlooker while grappling.

Where this video stands out from the crowd, however, is its treatment of what to do while grappling; specifically of striking from a close range. Many neglect striking at close ranges but this is not an effective way to train or teach for self-protection. The reality is that striking is absolutely necessary at this range as it is at any other, and effective power generation and targeting is essential. Geoff Thompson does a nice section on effective headbutting too, which is an often-overlooked area of combat, followed by some information on blood and air choking.

Making throws work for real combat is another module of essential knowledge that this video introduces you to. What is more interesting however is the section on bag work for grappling training, which I haven’t (yet) seen in any other video. The way they demonstrate the movements done on the bag with cuts to a live partner clip is very effective to help understand what you’re doing with this kind of work too.

I’ll finish with one quote that really stands out for me from this video: ‘the scruffy stuff works’. The concept of progressive sparring, perhaps new to many, is very much worth incorporating into any serious training. This video is well-worth adding to anyone’s collection and if grappling is a mystery to you then it is a certainly a very valuable introduction.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found at http://www.peterconsterdine.com/arena3.htm.

Review: ‘The Pavement Arena Part 2’ by Peter Consterdine and Geoff Thompson

Consterdine, Peter and Thompson, Geoff. The Pavement Arena Part Two: ‘The Protection Pyramid’. Legend Video Productions. 1993.

Review: The Pavement Arena Part 2: ‘The Protection Pyramid’:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

This review is part of a series. Part one can be found here, this is part two, part three can be found here, part four can be found here and part five (sort of – it follows on from part four but isn’t part of the Pavement Arena series) can be found here.

’Confidence […] from simplicity of approach’ – that sums up the efficiency of Peter and Geoff’s approach to self-protection, and indeed the approach of this series. Early on in the video Peter Consterdine advises people that if they bought a self-protection video that’s just a series of ‘physical tricks’, they should go and get their money back because that’s not what self-protection’s about. He’s spot-on. This video in the series deals with the psychological and conceptual side of self-protection; the proactive, preventative aspect that is often missing from or inadequate in many approaches. Going beyond the often-heard and easily-said ‘just stay aware and run off if you can’ that some still consider enough for this area, this video introduces the ‘Protection Pyramid’.

This video goes through concepts around personal security (as an umbrella term for threat awareness, threat evaluation and threat avoidance), attack scenarios, fear, types of attack, assessment (numbers of attackers, weapons, etc), perceptions, reaction (tactics, response and environment), lineups (‘the fence’), adrenaline switches, ranges and tools, targets, pre-emptive striking, multiple attackers, strategy and tactics in that order. As I’m sure is evident, this video is a highly useful and well-thought-out resource for anyone to learn from. The concepts above may sound complicated or even confusing at first glance, but the way they are explained makes the information readily accessible and easily understood.

The ‘Protection Pyramid’ is a graphic and visually illustrative way of presenting the complex problems and solutions of self protection. The Protection Pyramid continues the ‘no nonsense’ theme established in part one of this series and with re-constructed ‘street attacks’, the viewer can see clearly the reality of how traditional, unabridged martial arts systems will not work in such confrontations.

Each section of the pyramid illustrates a separate concept and build up to a comprehensive system for defensive tactics. This video does not only cover the physical aspects of self defence, but tackles the often forgotten aspects such as fear and how not to be psyched out by opponents. (Information taken from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/arena2.htm, 31.12.2012.)

I can’t recommend this enough. If you get any of the Pavement Arena series, get this one. The amount of information packed into this video really is phenomenal and it is essential for students, instructors and untrained members of the public alike. If you’re not well-educated in the theoretical side of self-protection then I recommend you invest in this video. If you are, I would anyway because you could learn something regardless. I did.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found at http://www.peterconsterdine.com/arena2.htm.

Review: ‘The Pavement Arena Part 1’ by Peter Consterdine and Geoff Thompson

Consterdine, Peter and Thompson, Geoff. The Pavement Arena Part One: ‘Ultimate Self Defence’. Legend Video Productions. 1993.

Review: The Pavement Arena Part 1: ‘Ultimate Self Defence’:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

This review is part of a series. This is part one, part two can be found here, part three can be found here, part four can be found here and part five (sort of – it follows on from part four but isn’t part of the Pavement Arena series) can be found here.

This video begins by making a very important point; that martial arts, self-defence and self-protection are not synonymous. Self-defence being reactive in nature and self-protection being instead proactive, this distinction is highly important to make clear and this video begins by doing so which immediately sets the tone of a well-thought-out methodology.

For many, this video and the resultant series was their first introduction to the difference between traditional martial arts training and efficient self-protection training for modern violence. This video includes sections on:

      • Distance Control
    • Mental Disarmament
    • Lineups
    • The Knockout
    • Pre-emptive Strikes
    • Power Kicking
    • Close Impact Targeting
    • Fear Control
    • Threat Awareness
    • Aggression & Response

(Information from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm, 30.12.2012)

Don’t be put off by the fact that they’re wearing Karate clothing in some of this. It’s not a traditional martial arts video. Some martial arts concepts are mentioned, such as Zanshin, but they are applicable to the subject matter of the video and the series on the whole. The importance of an understanding of relaxation and biomechanics in striking to generate effective power is emphasised throughout, and Peter Consterdine’s concept of the ‘double hip’ striking method is introduced.

What stands out is that it’s not one of those videos where the masters tell you how to do things and you see others doing it, or a voiceover with footage of training, but they talk you through it in a natural and easily followed manner while they show you themselves. Everything is explained thoroughly and logically, again in a well-thought-out way, and the language used is very accessible for anyone to understand.

Nearer the end, the three-part understanding of threat awareness, threat evaluation and threat avoidance is introduced, which touches on the personal security aspect of self-protection which is expanded on in the next video; The Pavement Arena Part 2: The Protection Pyramid.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found at http://www.peterconsterdine.com/arena1.htm.

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