Review: ‘Fit to Fight Part 2’ by Peter Consterdine

Consterdine, Peter. Fit to Fight Part 2. Protection Publications. 2000.

Review: Fit to Fight Part 2:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

This video follows on from the popular fourth video in the ‘Pavement Arena’ series, entitled ‘Fit to Fight’, which is reviewed here.

This video builds on the previous points raised in Fit to Fight but takes a different route through the subject matter. It caters more for those without the luxury of gym equipment and experienced partners, and thus deals with solo training and bodyweight exercises a lot more. Minimal equipment is required for most of the exercises in this video. There’s some good fitness-oriented bag work in this video which can add a lot to your fitness routine.

In the second half there’s a section for those who can find some training partners of similar levels of fitness or experience. The exercises and drills in this (particularly the bag work, focus mitts and shield drills) are fantastic for sharpening your skills, especially for martial artists. The concepts used can easily be applied to any kind of training, whether you’re coming at this from a martial arts perspective or one from a combative sport, from self-defence or self-protection. In short, there’s not very much to say for this video other than it’s extremely useful for anyone interested in getting serious with their fitness.

Watch this. Do the drills. You won’t regret it.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found at http://www.peterconsterdine.com/fit-to-fight.htm.

PHDefence Training Log–25.01.2013

IMAG0335Hopefully the last snowy one for a while! Friday’s session was split between me and Paul. Paul did some partner work involving dealing with strikes – specifically barrages of them – and I added in the importance of being proactive in your ‘defence’ rather than being merely reactive. If your partner is saying ‘I thought I was supposed to be the one attacking!’ or similar then you’re doing well!

If they’re too preoccupied to say anything then you’re doing better!

What came out in this drill was that when you’re proactive by pushing into the partner and making it difficult for them to attack instead of merely dealing with their attacks reactively, you stand a much better chance of surviving. Also through this approach it can be possible to manoeuvre your partner around the room and put them in a position of disadvantage, such as in a corner. In reality of course, this would be you putting them in a position that gave you the opportunity to complete your objective in a combative situation – run off!

Then in my half we worked on ground mobility with some standard Russian drills, groundfighting with a focus on controlling elbows, controlling legs and use of the head when fighting on the ground. After that, we did a rather enjoyable leg-locking drill inspired by an excellent British Combat Association video (the review will be appearing here soon…).

To finish, we began work with the higher grades on the long stick and how to use it with some simple stick acclimatisation drills, partner work and solo work. It’s always fun when a group gets onto a new weapon! I can’t wait to get to work with this a little more.

See you all next week!

%d bloggers like this: