Review: ‘Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Volume 2’ by Peter Consterdine

Consterdine, Peter. Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Volume 2. Protection Publications. 2005.

Review: Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Volume 2:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

Last week we looked at the excellent first part to this two-part series, which can be found here.

The Training Day videos follow on from the enquiries made after the popular Fit to Fight videos became well-known (part one reviewed here and part 2 reviewed here). As you may expect from a BCA video, this one is excellent. It’s fitness-oriented but is packed full of drills that are very combatively useful. The key point of the approach presented here to training is in developing functional fitness by doing cardio, etc that is at the same time developing combatively useful attributes.

The video begins with an important discussion from Peter about concomitancy or flow when putting movements together – ‘getting the transitions right’ – which is a key understanding for those interested in this kind of training. Training in this kind of high intensity and focussing on a small amount of methods is a great way to work on endurance and stamina while also improving the quality of the movement itself.

The video includes a number of additional drills following from the approach laid out in the first part of this pair, including pressure work and padwork with the focus mitts in threes as well as in pairs, punching and kicking drills, the ‘four-corner blitz’, ducking and weaving drills, shuttle drills, combination drills, repetition drills and pyramid drills.

Interspersed between these drills being demonstrated is Peter explaining key understandings for each section.

There’s also an attempt at the end from Brian Seabright to get 60 roundhouse kicks into a minute!

This video demonstrates, again, a group of highly skilled martial artists at work generating some impressive impact and, of course, making it look easy! I definitely recommend using these training methods yourself.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found at http://www.peterconsterdine.com/trainingday2.htm.

Review: ‘The Pavement Arena Part 3’ by Peter Consterdine and Geoff Thompson

Consterdine, Peter and Thompson, Geoff. The Pavement Arena Part Three: ‘Grappling – The Last Resort’. Legend Video Productions. 1994.

Review: The Pavement Arena Part 3: ‘Grappling – The Last Resort’:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

This review is part of a series. Part one can be found here, part two can be found here, this is part three, part four can be found here and part five (sort of – it follows on from part four but isn’t part of the Pavement Arena series) can be found here.

This third instalment in the popular ‘Pavement Arena’ series is, again, often eye-opening to its viewers. Many do not consider grappling in enough depth for its real combative applications, and many court it too much which can lead to problems of its own. With grappling in particular, a balance must be struck between training it enough to be competent and thus to (hopefully) survive the horrible situation of finding yourself grappling with an assailant, and training it to the exclusion of other things, such as punching. In addition, we must be very careful with how we train grappling, as it can be easy to fall into a sporting paradigm when learning grappling from arts such as Judo. While Judo is excellent and is one of the activities I personally intend to enjoy much more in the near future (as I feel I can learn a lot from it, it will be very enjoyable and will be great for my fitness and strength), we must remember that it is a sport and that certain aspects of sports-based training must be kept strictly separate from self-protection training, just as the premise of this series is that traditional martial arts training and self-protection training are not the same and thus the differences must be appreciated for self-protection training to be efficient.

This video begins with this essential discussion of the realities of grappling in real combative situations, which (as with the others of the series) sets the tone immediately of a solid and well-thought-out presentation. There are some ground mobility drills involving breakfalls near the beginning which, of course, are only to be used on mats. Rolling can work fine on a hard surface, but slapping breakfalls are good only for soft, level surfaces. Never attempt on a hard or uneven surface! They’re essential in grappling training on a matted surface though, in order for partners to fall more realistically for each other without injury and thus to allow the necessary full-force, realistic throwing. The required safety aspects of training in grappling are emphasised in the video, such as the Tap-Out safety system and the necessity of having an onlooker while grappling.

Where this video stands out from the crowd, however, is its treatment of what to do while grappling; specifically of striking from a close range. Many neglect striking at close ranges but this is not an effective way to train or teach for self-protection. The reality is that striking is absolutely necessary at this range as it is at any other, and effective power generation and targeting is essential. Geoff Thompson does a nice section on effective headbutting too, which is an often-overlooked area of combat, followed by some information on blood and air choking.

Making throws work for real combat is another module of essential knowledge that this video introduces you to. What is more interesting however is the section on bag work for grappling training, which I haven’t (yet) seen in any other video. The way they demonstrate the movements done on the bag with cuts to a live partner clip is very effective to help understand what you’re doing with this kind of work too.

I’ll finish with one quote that really stands out for me from this video: ‘the scruffy stuff works’. The concept of progressive sparring, perhaps new to many, is very much worth incorporating into any serious training. This video is well-worth adding to anyone’s collection and if grappling is a mystery to you then it is a certainly a very valuable introduction.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found at http://www.peterconsterdine.com/arena3.htm.

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