Training Notes – 20.02.2015

IMAG0206.jpgAs always, this week’s class was a lot of fun! Many thanks as always to everyone who came and we hope to see everyone else again soon! The sheer skill and natural ability I saw this week was phenomenal. Everyone did exceptionally well and should be extremely proud of their progress and prowess.

Here’s some brief notes to guide your martial ponderings…

  • We started off this week’s awesomeness with a circuit of the usual kinds of calisthenics exercises: pushups, Russian twists, throwing a slam ball, passing a kickshield from hands to feet and back again while lying down, dips and burpees.
  • Thoroughly warmed up, we loosened off with some quadrupedal movement before moving onto ground mobility drills involving a variety of rolls, takedowns and padwork from different positions.
  • This week we took the drill we did last week on dealing with an attack with a stick and expanded on it with many logical progressions. Some key points to remember:
    • Once you decide you need to deploy force, and you find the right moment in which to do so, you must act immediately, efficiently and decisively.
    • Close distance and use your elbows to your advantage!
    • Get control and make sure it’s a strong grip you have. Anything less than your strongest is not good enough.
    • Act fast: strike and control.
    • You might get hit a little despite your best efforts, but there’s varying degrees of how much that’ll ruin your day. Your positioning and footwork has a lot to do with this. Train intelligently and act efficiently!
  • We also looked at some options when using a high guard against straight and hooked punches coming towards us – it’s a very versatile and efficient method of protecting yourself.
    • Regardless, we’re not about to stand there and deal with one hit at a time! Just as with the stick:
      • Close distance and gain control.
      • Striking, striking, striking…
      • Disrupt their posture and you compromise them greatly – this can be used for takedowns or truly devastating striking opportunities. Or, if possible, just a shove and your chance to run away! Remember the Force Continuum – it has to be borne in mind at all times in your training.
  • Sometimes, try as we might to avoid things getting this bad, we end up on the floor with someone trying to turn our torso from convex to concave with their feet.
    • Again, act immediately, quickly, efficiently and decisively.
    • Close distance, claw and climb your way up them. Grab whatever you find: clothes, skin, muscle, fat, hair… it doesn’t matter. Like a monkey climbing a tree. Credit to Andrew Holland (http://theselfdefenceexpert.com/) for introducing me to this very useful concept in his excellent Primal Combatives session back in 2013.
    • The closer you are to those legs, the more difficult it is for them to kick you.
    • Get up. Fast. And don’t forget that if you need to then striking can be done on the way.
    • After a tiring set of drills combining much of the aforementioned, we finished off with some percussive massage (Russian style) as a relaxation and breathwork drill.

This class is free for beginners and runs every Friday at 17:45 in Stoke-on-Trent (ST99NX). Everyone is welcome and all the details can be found here (or just click ‘Public Training’ at the top).

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Review: ‘Ultimate Self-Defence Seminar’ by Peter Consterdine and Geoff Thompson

Consterdine, Peter and Thompson, Geoff. Ultimate Self-Defence Seminar. Protection Publications. 2005.

Review: Ultimate Self-Defence Seminar:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

This video is one of those well-known ones, considered essential by many, that you often hear about as an instructor. There’s good reason for that.

‘Action beats reaction’ – this is the key understanding that makes Geoff and Peter’s approach so much better than most when it comes to self-protection. Peter makes this point with a little demonstration of blocking’s uselessness in a reactive manner after a simple warmup of exercises chiefly concerned with coordination. He goes on to give what I consider the best explanation of the double-hip method of striking I’ve ever seen. There’s similarities between this and Systema’s waveform striking, which is definitely worth looking into as well if you like this method of power generation. I definitely do. It works very nicely for me, especially for body shots.

Following from this, Peter goes on to discuss and demonstrate sections on: speed and the flinch response, pre-emptive striking, UK self-defence law, adrenaline and the physiological biochemical responses of stress, pre-planning for violence, the effects of mind-altering chemicals, effective punchbag training, dialogue training, palm striking, the issues around striking with the knuckles to the face, lining up an aggressor, the biomechanics of efficient striking, zanshin, footwork, distance’s effect on striking opportunities, and the effects of surprise and shock on striking efficacy.

‘There’s no growth in comfort.’ I’ve got that up in the garage with my punchbag. For the second half, Geoff Thompson takes over and begins with hook punching on the pads, then a drill of striking with restricted movement. Afterwards, Geoff goes on to discuss and demonstrate sections on: fear and discomfort, double-hip striking towards the face, verbal distraction and deception with pre-emptive striking, usage of ‘the fence’ and shows of aggression, dynamic biomechanics in kicking (with Peter Consterdine), bodyweight grappling drills, foot tripping and trapping drills, striking from positions of biomechanical disadvantage, throwing and groundfighting, the importance of reading and learning, and attitudinal changes that are beneficial to training and to combat.

This really is a gem of a video. I personally find it quite motivational to listen to aside from the training ideas it offers. I highly recommend this one in particular as a worthy addition to any instructor’s shelf. Moreover, I would recommend this to students and prospective students too – if your instructor or prospective instructor doesn’t discuss any the kinds of things shown in this video (or especially if they’re ignorant of the concepts) then chances are they’re not worth your time. That’s a strong thing to say, I realise, but I feel that the quality of the basic information and sentiment behind this video’s content is substantial enough to warrant such a statement. The bottom line: watch this.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found at http://peterconsterdine.com/ultimatesd.htm.

Review: ‘Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Volume 2’ by Peter Consterdine

Consterdine, Peter. Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Volume 2. Protection Publications. 2005.

Review: Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Volume 2:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

Last week we looked at the excellent first part to this two-part series, which can be found here.

The Training Day videos follow on from the enquiries made after the popular Fit to Fight videos became well-known (part one reviewed here and part 2 reviewed here). As you may expect from a BCA video, this one is excellent. It’s fitness-oriented but is packed full of drills that are very combatively useful. The key point of the approach presented here to training is in developing functional fitness by doing cardio, etc that is at the same time developing combatively useful attributes.

The video begins with an important discussion from Peter about concomitancy or flow when putting movements together – ‘getting the transitions right’ – which is a key understanding for those interested in this kind of training. Training in this kind of high intensity and focussing on a small amount of methods is a great way to work on endurance and stamina while also improving the quality of the movement itself.

The video includes a number of additional drills following from the approach laid out in the first part of this pair, including pressure work and padwork with the focus mitts in threes as well as in pairs, punching and kicking drills, the ‘four-corner blitz’, ducking and weaving drills, shuttle drills, combination drills, repetition drills and pyramid drills.

Interspersed between these drills being demonstrated is Peter explaining key understandings for each section.

There’s also an attempt at the end from Brian Seabright to get 60 roundhouse kicks into a minute!

This video demonstrates, again, a group of highly skilled martial artists at work generating some impressive impact and, of course, making it look easy! I definitely recommend using these training methods yourself.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found at http://www.peterconsterdine.com/trainingday2.htm.

Review: ‘Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Volume 1’ by Peter Consterdine

Consterdine, Peter. Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Volume 1. Protection Publications. 2004.

Review: Peter Consterdine’s Training Day Volume 1:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

This review is part one of a two-part series. Part two is can be found here.

The Training Day videos follow on from the enquiries made after the popular Fit to Fight videos became well-known (part one reviewed here and part 2 reviewed here). As you may expect from a BCA video, this one is excellent. It’s fitness-oriented but is packed full of drills that are very combatively useful. The key point of the approach presented here to training is in developing functional fitness by doing cardio, etc that is at the same time developing combatively useful attributes.

There’s a lot of ideas in here for incorporating bag work, pad work, shuttle drills, partner drills, pressure work,  traditional Karate padwork drills with a fitness focus, ‘slow-mo’ sparring, pyramid drills and shield kicking drills.

As well as just the drills, this video shows a group of absolutely phenomenal punchers and kickers at work. There’s some fantastic impact generated by these martial artists; very high levels of skill demonstrated indeed. Martial artists in this video include (of course) Peter Consterdine, Brian Seabright, Bernard Taylor, Steve Williams and Richard Hardy.

I definitely recommend taking a look at this training session and using it yourself as a basis for yours. It really is excellent.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found athttp://www.peterconsterdine.com/trainingday1.htm.

Review: ‘Fit to Fight Part 2’ by Peter Consterdine

Consterdine, Peter. Fit to Fight Part 2. Protection Publications. 2000.

Review: Fit to Fight Part 2:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

This video follows on from the popular fourth video in the ‘Pavement Arena’ series, entitled ‘Fit to Fight’, which is reviewed here.

This video builds on the previous points raised in Fit to Fight but takes a different route through the subject matter. It caters more for those without the luxury of gym equipment and experienced partners, and thus deals with solo training and bodyweight exercises a lot more. Minimal equipment is required for most of the exercises in this video. There’s some good fitness-oriented bag work in this video which can add a lot to your fitness routine.

In the second half there’s a section for those who can find some training partners of similar levels of fitness or experience. The exercises and drills in this (particularly the bag work, focus mitts and shield drills) are fantastic for sharpening your skills, especially for martial artists. The concepts used can easily be applied to any kind of training, whether you’re coming at this from a martial arts perspective or one from a combative sport, from self-defence or self-protection. In short, there’s not very much to say for this video other than it’s extremely useful for anyone interested in getting serious with their fitness.

Watch this. Do the drills. You won’t regret it.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found at http://www.peterconsterdine.com/fit-to-fight.htm.

Review: ‘The Pavement Arena Part 4’ by Peter Consterdine and Geoff Thompson

Consterdine, Peter and Thompson, Geoff. The Pavement Arena Part Four: ‘Fit to Fight’. Legend Video Productions. 1994.

Review: The Pavement Arena Part 4: ‘Fit to Fight’:
by Josh Nixon, ESP

This article is part of a series. Part one can be found here, part two can be found here, part three can be found here, this is part four and part five (sort of – it follows on from this video but isn’t part of the Pavement Arena series) can be found here.

Part four of the Pavement Arena series focuses on how to cultivate the mental and physical attributes required to train efficiently and be more likely to survive a violent encounter. While the physical benefits of fitness training are transient, the mental benefits are the focus of this video’s approach. The desire not to be victimised and the will to ensure that this does not occur can be bolstered with the psychological elements of perseverance and determination that can be gained from fitness training.

The video goes through resistance training for a good balance of muscle endurance and strength, with a lot of advice on using machines and weights for resistance training. There’s also some information on cardiovascular training and elements of HIIT in particular, which is recommended for any respectable fitness training routine. Later, there’s some exercise that doesn’t require gym equipment (some requiring partners and some which don’t) which is fantastic for general fitness as well as for combative training.

There are some exercises that are combatively focussed, but anyone can do them and you don’t have to be a martial artist or a self-protectionist to do them or to benefit greatly from them. The running and kicking drills in particular are great for flexibility and explosive power, as well as being good cardio. There’s groundwork in here and bag work too which adds a lot to this training’s usefulness for anyone doing a martial art, combat sport, self-defence or self-protection. At the end there’s a section on training outside with and without partners which, again, is full of excellent ideas.

All in all, I would recommend this as essential knowledge for fitness training in general, and definitely for anyone who is also combatively interested. If you’re new to fitness training or how to factor it into your existing combative training, this is definitely for you.

This video is available on DVD or for digital download (much cheaper, understandably) from http://www.peterconsterdine.com/store.htm. Further information and a download link can also be found at http://www.peterconsterdine.com/arena4.htm.

PHDefence Groundfighting Seminar with Josh Nixon, Saturday 14.05.2011

I’ll be going down to the main PHDefence class next Saturday (14.05.2011) and doing a groundfighting seminar for them – price and times are same as always:

Wesley Methodist Chapel, Stockton Brook, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, UK
10:00 – 12:00 (end time is a little fuzzy – never less than 2 hours, but sometimes runs over a little)
£4 per student (for Paul, not for me)

I heartily recommend coming down and having a go – it doesn’t matter if you’re not already a PHDefence or CSPS student, all grades, ages, abilities are welcome. It’ll be a fun and informative introduction to locking, throwing, striking, moving, etc on the ground, greatly influenced of course by, C&R, Jujutsu and Systema. Very practical and hands-on as always, not artsy and fancy. You don’t have to wear a gi either, it’s not traditional (but you can if you want, it’s not a big deal).

Note to PHDefence students: I know most of this isn’t on your syllabus. Don’t worry it’s not going to be on your grading. It’s because what I’ll be doing is CSPS groundfighting, which is not strictly speaking PHDefence methods, despite the similarities.

See you then! If there’s any questions about CSPS or what we’re doing in the seminar then you know where we are, otherwise if you have a PHDefence question chuck an email over to Paul at p.horrobin@yahoo.com .

FCIns. Josh Nixon

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