Free Open Snow Day Training Workshop! (Friday, 30th January, 2015)

Due to the chaos caused by a bit of snow last night, we’ve decided to do things a little differently and have ourselves an Open Snow Day Training Workshop!

Anyone and everyone is welcome to drop in any time between 17:00 and 19:00 today, and anyone who does brave the blizzards and storm the snowdrifts to get to us can have a cuppa on us too.

If it’s your first time training with us, you’re welcome to come and have your first session for free!

We’ll be covering a variety of topics, including:

  • threat awareness
  • threat evaluation
  • threat avoidance
  • management of (and awareness of) personal space and positioning
  • preparations for taking action
  • upper-body and lower-body striking
  • power generation and impact management
  • ground mobility
  • escapes
  • parrying, jamming and blocking
  • throws, takedowns and breaking posture
  • problem-solving in combative situations
  • dealing with armed assault: surviving attacks with blunt and edged weapons

We train at The Wesley Methodist Church hall, Leek New Road, Stockton Brook, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, ST9 9NX and usually our training session is 17:45-18:45 every Friday.

All welcome as are your questions! Don’t forget – this is all free if it’s your first time so feel free to drop in, have a cuppa and learn something about what we do.

You can reach me at 01782502684 (landline) or 07981175878 (mobile but I’ll have negligible signal until about 16:00 or so), or on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/EvolutionarySelfProtection .

I made an event on Facebook for it: http://www.facebook.com/events/1531366307150866
And one on Streetlife! http://www.streetlife.com/conversation/d95jspv6e2el/

See you later!

-Josh Nixon

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8 Crucial Considerations For Getting a Taxi

https://i2.wp.com/openphoto.net/volumes/lukestodola/20050126/openphotonet_1_pict0020.jpgIt’s that time of year when the nights are getting longer and colder, the days are getting shorter and colder, and the weather is getting wetter and colder. Oh yes, and it’s getting colder!

One result of this is that at the end of the day (or night) a lot of us will be getting into a taxi for our journey home. Let’s face it, it’s either that, get home wet and/or freezing cold after an unpleasant walk, or wetter and colder after a worse wait at a bus stop. If your bus service is anything like mine, then it could be a very long wait followed by a disgruntled walk anyway!

This reminded me of the fact that I’ve been meaning to throw these ideas up for absolutely ages, ever since I saw a little flyer made by the union at Staffordshire University (www.staffsunion.com) on the subject of staying safe while getting a taxi. As a result, here are eight small but absolutely crucial personal security considerations when using taxis:

1) Always pre-order your taxi. If you can, try your very best to pre-book your taxi in advance with a company you know and trust. Preferably one you’ve used before. This way your lift is more easily verifiable (if you order an ‘A-Team’ taxi and you get a ‘B-People’ one at your doorstep peeping, you may have a perfectly justifiable reason to distrust the taxi and not go out for it.

2) Don’t get in unmarked cars. This should be an obvious one but it was on the flyer so I’ll say it here as well just in case it isn’t! Whatever you do, don’t get into an unmarked ‘taxi’. You have no idea who is driving or what they want. You can, however, be pretty sure it isn’t a taxi. You can also be definitely certain that it isn’t worth the risk to find out!https://i0.wp.com/openphoto.net/volumes/petanjek/20111111/openphotonet_P1090581a.JPG

3) Make sure the driver’s badge and license number are clearly visible. This is information that you can get while booking as well, which provides an easy way to verify that the car you’re getting into is indeed the car you ordered. Ask the company to text or just tell you the licence plate number of the car, and/or the driver’s number. That way you can check it’s your driver.

4) Sit in the back. This is advice I often see on things pertaining to taxi safety, and I’m in two minds about it. If you’re in the back you have advantages in a combative situation in that it’s more difficult for him to twist around to attack you and also more difficult for him to see what you’re doing behind him. However, if your driver is on a mad rampage wanting to send you both into a wall then you can more easily gain some control of the wheel or handbrake, or even (maybe) the pedals if you gain a lot of control over the situation combatively. Sounds ridiculous I know, but let’s not discount such an event as impossible. That would be an example of us leaving ourselves a severe weakness. We are very vulnerable in situations we previously discounted as impossible, so consider it seriously for a moment. Could you, for example, brake with an unconscious driver’s leg? How might you do that? How else might you try to stop the car and get out without death or serious injury? Aside from all that, sitting in the front means you can more easily see the dude’s (or dudette’s) hands. That’s something many people who’ve had the displeasure of being attacked with a knife (or indeed any other weapon) hadn’t previously thought of. Afterwards, most do.

5) Keep your mobile to hand. Common sense, but often not done. If it’s to hand, and unlocked, ready for you to dial emergency services at a moment’s notice, something serious could well be averted or made less serious. At the very least, it could mean that once whatever crime was in the driver’s mind has been committed, he may be more likely to be caught so he can’t do it again to someone else. In the best-case scenario, however, it may act as a deterrent because he may have noticed that you’re obviously ready and not an easy victim. Making yourself a ‘hard target’ is crucial to your personal security.

6) Avoid travelling alone. I’m sure I don’t need to explain this one! It’s pretty much instinctual. Do you feel more scared walking through the house in the dark alone or with a friend? That feeling is what I’m talking about. With others, you’re simply making yourself a harder target. It should be said though that you may want to be choosy with this, as there are those who are so deeply in a victim state that they can pull the people around them into danger (I’m sure most of us will know at least one or two people who might be considered ‘liabilities’ for whatever reason) and generally get people into trouble. From the perspective of your own personal security you want to avoid these people, and from the perspective of your social responsibility (don’t worry, I’m not about to get on my soap box) then you may want to consider educating them! That way they stop getting themselves into horrible situations and you get yourself a friend you can depend on when you’re out. Worth thinking about.https://i0.wp.com/openphoto.net/volumes/lukestodola/20050126/openphotonet_1_pict0019.jpg

7) Don’t throw your details around. When you’re booking your taxi, do so somewhere where it would be difficult for anyone to overhear your name, address or number. It may be possible to text these details instead of say them over the phone with some taxi companies, and thus avoid anyone overhearing if you can’t get away. When you’re waiting for your pre-booked taxi outside, if you’re asked by anyone claiming to be an unknown waiting taxi driver (or indeed anyone else) then don’t tell them. Instead, ask them for the name and destination of the fare they’re waiting for. If it’s your name and destination then that’s probably your driver! If not, it’s not so don’t go with them or tell them anything.

8) It’s your taxi – nobody else’s. Unless you know and trust them, don’t let anyone elbow their way into your taxi. You simply don’t know them or why they want to be in the taxi with you. If you want a good example of why you should think about this, go and watch Luc Besson’s ‘Taken‘ (2008) if you haven’t already.

Of course there’s many more considerations for when you’re getting taxis, but these are just a few thoughts prompted by a flyer. If you have any others you would recommend, then you’re more than welcome to furnish us all with your ideas in the comments below! If you have any questions then the same is true. Whatever you do, whether you’re getting a taxi or not then the kinds of thought processes that have led to these ideas are absolutely crucial for your general personal security. If the reasoning behind anything here doesn’t make sense, please make sure you get in touch and ask me what I’m thinking and why! If you disagree with me then that’s fine, but if you can’t even understand where the ideas are coming from then that’s an important issue that needs to be addressed! Either for you or for me.

Until next time,

Josh Nixon, ESP

Images courtesy of Luke Stodola and Jasenka Petanjek:
’Toronto’ found at http://openphoto.net/gallery/image.html?image_id=7176
’NYC Cab’ found at http://openphoto.net/gallery/image.html?image_id=24337
’Toronto’ (2) found at http://openphoto.net/gallery/image.html?image_id=7187
used with thanks.

Recent Local Crime Updates: Distraction Tactics and Burglary

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‘CONSTANT VIGILANCE!’ as Professor Moody always says…

Today there’s been a couple of updates from Staffordshire Police following some recent criminal activity. It seems there’s a bit of a pattern going around of distraction tactics, whereby a criminal uses a false identity, usually a salesman or a member of the Water, Gas or Electric Board. Remember – these don’t exist! Nobody from the Water Board, Gas Board or Electric Board are telling the truth, as these companies do not exist!

Officers are looking for witnesses of burglaries in Wolseley Road, Rugeley, that took place on Tuesday the 27th of September.

The following is some more advice from Staffordshire Police:

Residents are reminded to take simple crime prevention measures to protect their homes and keep burglars at bay:

  • secure passageways and side entrances, make sure sheds and garages are fitted with proper security locks, and put away tools so they can’t be used to break in to your home
  • if you have to leave ladders outside, make sure they’re on their side and securely fixed to a wall or permanent fixture
  • keep wheelie bins secure and away from your property to stop thieves using them to get through first floor windows, or setting fire to them
  • mark items with your postcode and house number using an ‘invisible’ pen available from DIY stores. This makes stolen property easier to identify
  • ensure valuable items are not left in plain view and keep them away from windows and doors
  • fit mortise locks to all front and back doors and locks to windows that are in easy reach
  • keep house and car keys safe and away from doors, windows and letterboxes
  • keep garages and sheds secure
  • fit low cost security lighting as a deterrent.

According to their reports, families of the elderly and vulnerable are being encouraged to warn their relatives against opening the door to callers like these. On Friday the 30th of September, a distraction thief struck in the High Street, Alton. At around 14:40 an 87-year-old man opened the door to a white male, aged around 35, with brown hair, who was approximately 6ft tall and said he was from the Nottingham area. It is believed he had an ID card of some sort, but no details were noted. He sold a cleaning utensil to the resident from a holdall he was carrying, and then asked for a drink. The victim obliged, and returned to pay the criminal, who had used the opportunity to steal some money from the house. The following is some advice for this kind of situation:

Residents are asked to remain vigilant at all times and to follow this advice:

  • Never trust anyone calling at the door without a prior appointment. Should you receive such a call leave the door locked. The caller will hear  you through the door when you ask them who they are. If they state they are from a utilities company ask for your account number, they should have this, if not, do not let them in and tell them to leave, and that you are calling the Police.
  • Always ask for ID, and check it.
  • Do not allow anyone to carry work out on your home, or sell you anything when they cold call at the door. If you do require work to be done, INSTIGATE IT YOURSELF, by phoning three companies asking for like for like quotes. Then decide.
  • Do not keep large amounts of cash in your home, you may think that you have the perfect hiding place, but these criminals will find it.
  • Please remember there is no such company as the Water Board, Gas Board or Electric Board. These words are only used by offenders.
  • Always report any suspicious behaviour to the police, if you think it is suspicious, it probably is.
  • Keep your doors locked even when you are home.

Residents should also follow the stop, chain and check rule when people call at the door:

  • STOP – If you are not expecting anybody and they don’t have an appointment – don’t let them in
  • CHAIN – Use your door chain or bar before opening the door
  • CHECK – Ask to see ID and double check this.

People can also use the Nominate a Neighbour (NAN) scheme which diverts cold callers to a neighbour who will check caller’s identity. NAN packs are available from local police stations.

If you’re elderly or disabled, then that means you are a more viable victim for these kinds of crimes – you will be slower to go upstairs and flush the toilet to check the water, or go and get the nice man at the door that drink. As such, you should keep this in mind with your personal security – do not feel rude by making people wait outside, and closing the door on them while you get the money, drink, or whatever else. Never feel as though you should allow someone inside your house. It is your private home, and they have no right to enter it without invitation!

Also remember that similar distraction tactics are used ‘on the street’ – it’s not just the people knocking on the door you have to worry about.

Contact details can be found on the original articles for witnesses or for questions, and a wealth of information and advice from a friendly, informed user base can be found at the (free) CSPS online forum at http://cspsonline.proboards.com – a wonderful place to share your advice and benefit from others’!

STAY SAFE!

Burglaries in Rugeley: http://www.staffordshire.police.uk/news/latest_appeals/111004_21_rugeley/?view=Standard&utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=twitterfeed

Distraction Tactics: http://www.staffordshire.police.uk/news/news_releases/111004_ia_distraction_tactics/?view=Standard

Image courtesy of: http://www.kingston.gov.uk/cold_calling.jpg

Security Warning from Staffs Police

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Staffordshire Police have issued a warning today to remember your home security, in light of ‘several recent burglaries across the south of the county’.

Of course, this advice applies all the time, not just in higher-risk times!

Is your home safe?

Properties in the Rugeley, Stafford, Cannock and Uttoxeter areas were targeted by offenders.

The majority of these properties were left insecure and small items including wallets, mobiles and handbags were stolen.

Residents are urged to look at their property through the eyes of a burglar and make adjustments if there are weak security spots.

This is really good advice when considering your home security. It is also a good idea to apply this to your personal security – look at yourself through the eyes of a mugger, ‘monkey-dance’ thug, rapist or sadistic violence opportunist. You’ll learn a lot about yourself and your personal security.

The warning urges people to lock their doors and shut windows when they go upstairs or into the garden. I always say to people (because it’s true) that you should consider an unlocked door an open door, as it very nearly is. The barrier it presents to a committed criminal is negligible at best.

To keep burglars at bay:
  • secure passageways and side entrances, make sure sheds and garages are fitted with proper security locks, and put away tools so they can’t be used to break in to your home
  • if you have to leave ladders outside, make sure they’re on their side and securely fixed to a wall or permanent fixture
  • keep wheelie bins secure and away from your property to stop thieves using them to get through first floor windows, or setting fire to them
  • mark items with your postcode and house number using an ‘invisible’ pen available from DIY stores. This makes stolen property easier to identify
  • ensure valuable items are not left in plain view and keep them away from windows and doors
  • fit mortise locks to all front and back doors and locks to windows that are in easy reach
  • keep house and car keys safe and away from doors, windows and letterboxes
  • keep garages and sheds secure
  • fit low cost security lighting as a deterrent.

All good advice – it should be common sense and second nature though! If you’ve got any doubts, questions, worries, etc about this kind of thing then there’s further information on www.staffordshire.police.uk or you can call their non emergency number on 0300 123 4455.

Alternately, join the discussions already taking place on our forum – it’s completely free, and the users are all friendly and respectful. Find us at http://cspsonline.proboards.com, or use the button at the top of this page.

There’s a discussion started on whether you’re prepared or not here – what do you do to keep your home safe from invasion? http://cspsonline.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=general&action=display&thread=26

There’s a discussion here about the (fairly) recent clarification of UK home defence law as well, with useful links to further information: http://cspsonline.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=general&action=display&thread=27

The original police article can be read here: http://www.staffordshire.police.uk/news/news_releases/110926_21_security_warning/?view=Standard

Image courtesy of Guardian.co.uk (http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Money/Pix/pictures/2007/09/26/Burglar276.jpg)

‘Beware of Bogus Callers’–Staffs Police Update

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Today, Staffs Police issued this warning following a recent incident. In addition to the police’s advice, always remember that you can call the company they profess to represent, and check their ID that they should provide before taking the chain off or even opening the door – this includes police officers and community workers! If you’re not confident in your ability to check their ID yourself (would you really know if it was fake?) then just call their company – they shouldn’t mind at all. If they do, then they’re either dodgy or unprofessional, and in either case you don’t really want them in your house, whether they’re doing work for you or not! Stay vigilant!

It is believed two men were working together and used a water-related rouse to trick their way into the home of an elderly lady. It is not known if the offenders had access to a vehicle.

At approximately 6pm one of the men called at the home of the 91-year-old and claimed to be in the area ‘doing the drains’. He entered the house and asked her to run the tap and flush the toilet to make sure the water was running clear.

Whilst the lady was distracted it is believed the second man has entered the house and stole a small amount of cash and documents.

Descriptions of the men follow:

The second man was not seen but the first is described as white, aged 40 to 50, with dark brown hair worn in a side parting. He was approximately 6ft and well built. He was softly spoken and polite. He wore dark casual clothing and did not have any identification.

Investigations are underway, and ‘officers want to speak to anyone with information, or who saw suspicious persons and/or vehicles in the area prior to the incident. Residents are encouraged to contact police if and every time they have suspicions about any caller at their door. Even if someone claims to be an official – and that includes police officers and council representatives – people must get their ID checked out.’

The police have also issued the following advice:

  • Never trust anyone calling at the door without a prior appointment. Should you receive such a call leave the door locked. The caller will hear you through the door when you ask them who they are. If they state they are from a utilities company ask for your account number, they should have this, if not, do not let them in and tell them to leave, and that you are calling the Police.
  • Always ask for ID, and check it.
  • Do not allow anyone to carry work out on your home, or sell you anything when they cold call at the door. If you do require work to be done, INSTIGATE IT YOURSELF, by phoning three companies asking for like for like quotes. Then decide.
  • Do not keep large amounts of cash in your home, you may think that you have the perfect hiding place, but these criminals will find it.
  • Please remember there is no such company as the Water Board, Gas Board or Electric Board. These words are only used by offenders.
  • Always report any suspicious behaviour to the police, if you think it is suspicious, it probably is.
  • Keep your doors locked even when you are home.

Residents should also follow the stop, chain and check rule when people call at the door:

  • STOP – If you are not expecting anybody and they don’t have an appointment – don’t let them in
  • CHAIN – Use your door chain or bar before opening the door
  • CHECK – Ask to see ID and double check this.

People can also use the Nominate a Neighbour (NAN) scheme which diverts cold callers to a neighbour who will check caller’s identity. NAN packs are available from local police stations.

Anyone with information on the incidents is asked to contact Dc Colin Rushton at Staffordshire Police on 0300 123 44 55 quoting incident 700 of 19 September, or Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

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